Double Group banner

Double Group - Assoc Professor Kay Double

Our research focuses on why only certain brain cells die in the common neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease and the disease processes that result in the death of these cells. We are using this information about why certain brain cells are vulnerable to death to help us develop new treatments to improve the survival of these cells and thus prevent Parkinson’s disease. We are also developing novel diagnostic methods for Parkinson’s disease so we can diagnose the disease earlier and more accurately than is currently possible. Our approach combines the use of human studies, both in living patients and postmortem brain tissues, as well as models of Parkinson's disease.

Assoc Prof; Neuroscience, Brain and Mind Centre and Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney
Honorary Principal Research Fellow, NeuRA
Conjoint Assoc Prof, Pharmacology, School of Medicine, UNSW
Medicine Faculty, Neurochemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Germany (Habilitation in Neurochemistry)
T: +612 9114 4292
E: k.double@neura.edu.au

Assoc Prof Kay Double is an academic and neurochemist with a strong interest in neuronal vulnerability in movement disorders and the development of neuroprotective treatments. At NeuRA, her collaboratorions span projects in neuroimaging of dopaminergic dysfunction, neuropathology in Parkinson's disease and neurogenesis in neurodegenerative conditions. Her laboratory is based at the Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney. Assoc Prof Double teaches at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels at the University of Sydney and hosts Australian and international undergraduate and graduate students completing research projects in her laboratory. She has extensive national and international collaborations and holds the postdoctoral degree of the Habilitation (University of Würzburg, Germany).

Changes in central movement circuits in health and disease

Current brain imaging techniques for a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, such as PET and MRI, are expensive and difficult to access.

Hippocampal neurogenesis and dementia risk in ageing and disease

The hippocampus is a brain region closely associated with memory formation and cognition, and it has been suggested that dysfunction of the hippocampus may increase the risk of developing dementia.

Research team 
Dr Kay Double's picture
Assoc Professor Kay Double
Assoc Prof; Neuroscience, Brain and Mind Centre and Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney
Honorary Principal Research Fellow, NeuRA
T: +612 9114 4292
E: k.double@neura.edu.au

JOIN US