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Paxinos Group - Scientia Professor George Paxinos AO

Brain researchers, no less than geographers, need maps and coordinate systems to navigate the brain and communicate their observations to each other. On a map of the brain we can superimpose types of neurons, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and connectivity and functional data. We are continuing to develop and refine brain atlases of humans and experimental animals which are used internationally as the standard guides for scientific work and are also used by neurosurgeons to target small deep lying structures in the brain.

NHMRC Australia Fellow, NeuRA
Visiting/Conjoint Professor of Psychology and Medical Sciences, UNSW
T: +612 9399 1094
E: g.paxinos@neura.edu.au

George Paxinos completed his BA at The University of California at Berkeley, his PhD at McGill University and spent a postdoctoral year at Yale University. He is the author of The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates, which is ranked by Thomson ISI amongst the 50 most cited items in the Web of Science. He has also written another 38 books on the structure of the brain of humans and experimental animals. His work was recognised by an AO, Ramaciotti Medal, Humboldt Prize, Award of Excellence of The Association of American Publishers, and the Australian Psychological Society's Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award.


Nissl and AChE Staining Protocols for Beginners
An interview with Prof Paxinos and Prof Watson on ABC's Catalyst, 8 Nov 2007

3D reconstructions of the brain of the mouse and rat

Recently, brain atlases are being transformed from passive paper guides to dynamic organising principles at the core of databases.

Atlases of the rat and human spinal cord:

With support from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation and from the NSW Office of Science and Medical Research my laboratory is completing atlases of the rat and mouse spinal cord.

Development of the mouse brain

The mouse is increasingly being used as a model of many human conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's Disease and epilepsy.

Homologies between the cortex and humans and other primates.

With support from the National Institute of Health of the US, we are constructing an atlas of the marmoset brain.

Identification of rhombomeres in mammals on the basis of avian homologies and transgenic mice.

This project involves the use of developmental data to decipher the organization of the brainstem.

The organization of the human hypothalamus

We are studying the hypothalamus of the normal human so that it will provide a baseline for comparisons with pathological tissue.

Research team 
Scientia Prof George Paxinos AO's picture
Scientia Professor George Paxinos AO
NHMRC Australia Fellow, NeuRA
Visiting/Conjoint Professor of Psychology and Medical Sciences, UNSW
T: +612 9399 1094
E: g.paxinos@neura.edu.au
Zoltan Rusznak's picture
Dr Zoltan Rusznak
Senior Research Officer
T: +612 9399 1096
E: z.rusznak@neura.edu.au
Dr Yuhong Fu's picture
Dr Yuhong Fu
Senior Research Officer
T: +612 9399 1128
E: y.fu@neura.edu.au
Andy Liang's picture
Dr Andy Liang
Research Assistant
T: +612 9399 1128
E: a.liang@neura.edu.au

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