Digitally created image of inner ear

Vestibular

RESEARCH STUDY

IMPROVING CLINICAL TESTS OF VESTIBULAR (BALANCE) FUNCTION

We are seeking healthy individuals aged 40 years and over for a study aiming to improve clinical tests of vestibular (balance) function. By investigating and optimising current recording techniques our research seeks to advance the identification of disease or impairment in older subjects, and this is of particular importance as the normal effects of aging often obstruct underlying balance issues. Our study uses non-invasive techniques to record muscle activity (using skin surface electrodes) in response to brief stimulation of the balance organs.

To be considered, participants must have:

  • no history of inner ear pathology (dizziness or vertigo) that required hospitalization
  • no neurological illness
  • no conductive hearing loss

Participants will be asked to undergo a single session of testing that will take place at the Prince of Wales hospital. The study lasts for approximately 1 to 1.5 hrs. Interested participants can contact Danielle Dennis (d.dennis@neura.edu.au) or Sendhil Govender (s.govender@neura.edu.au) for further information or ring 93822430. Participants can be reimbursed up to a value of $50 for any travel or parking expenses incurred during their visit.

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Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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