Home Vestibular Rehabilitation Device

RESEARCH STUDY

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

The Balance and Vision Laboratory at Neuroscience Research Australia has developed a safe, non-invasive, rehabilitation technique that after a single 15 minute session can increase the vestibular (balance) response by up to 50%. They have shown that the technique can be administered using a portable device under a controlled setting. As part of that study they are seeking patients with well-defined, isolated, peripheral, vestibular lesions.

The study aims to determine whether exercises that aim to normalise function of your vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which has been damaged due to injury of the vestibular organ/nerve, leads to improvements in your ability to stabilise vision during head movements, improves your balance, makes walking easier and generally improves your quality of life. You will be asked to take home an Australian developed rehabilitation device that will allow you to perform a 15 minute, once-daily, rehabilitation exercise. You will be asked to come to the laboratory once per month to measure your progress.

Each visit to the laboratory will take about two hours and consist of 5 parts:

  1. Complete a 10 minute questionnaire.
  2. Measurement of your vestibulo-ocular reflex function.
  3. Measurement of your visual ability during head movement.
  4. Measurement of your standing balance stability.
  5. Measurement of your walking stability.

If you are interested in being a subject or would like any further information please contact:

Dr. Americo Migliaccio

Email: a.migliaccio@neura.edu.au

Tel: 02 9399 1030

FURTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION

The Balance and Vision lab at NeuRA have developed a safe, non-invasive rehabilitation technique and device that can improve the function of the vestibular (balance) system.

We’re now at a clinical trial phase to determine the effectiveness in balance, walking, general symptoms and vestibular nerve function in patients with well-defined, isolated, peripheral vestibular lesions.

These include:

  • neuritis
  • labyrinthitis
  • schwannoma (stable)
  • vestibular hypofunction

Unfortunately, you’re NOT eligible if you suffer from

  • BPPV (benign paroxsymal positional vertigo)
  • migraine with aura
  • motion sickness
  • seizures
  • very low blood pressure (systolic must be greater than 90 and diastolic greater than 60)
  • low resting heartbeat (greater than 60, unless you’re taking beta-blockers)

Additionally, you must be:

  • aged 18-80 years
  • available to come in for 4 days during week 1, and once per month for following 12 months
  • willing to do 15 minutes of home training per day
  • willing to travel to NeuRA facilities in Randwick in Sydney (near Prince of Wales Hospital)

If you satisfy the above criteria and would like to be considered for the study, please call Carlo Rinaudo on (02) 9399 1276, or email c.rinaudo@neura.edu.au

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