Motorcycle Protective Clothing Study

RESEARCH STUDY

Neuroscience Research Australia is researching the use of protective clothing among motorcyclists.

We are interested in:

  • Understanding more about the benefits riders see in the use of protective clothing
  • Understanding more about how riders choose the clothing they wear when riding
  • Understanding more about the challenges faced by riders in using protective clothing when they ride

If you are a motorcyclist aged 18 years and over and have ridden on-road in the previous month, you may be able to take part in our study. Participation is completely voluntary, and participants are free to withdraw from the study at any time and for any reason.

If you decide to participate, you will take part in a 1-2 hour focus group with other motorcycle riders in NSW. Travel costs will be reimbursed and lunch will be provided on the day. Your participation can help us develop a better understanding of what benefits and challenges the rider experience when using protective clothing, and how to best communicate with riders about protective clothing.

If you would like more information on the study please contact Catherine Ho on 9399 1848 or on email: c.ho@neura.edu.au. Alternatively, to register your availabilities for the focus groups, please click here to fill in a quick survey and we will get in touch with you as soon as possible.

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