Online Motor Imagery Task

RESEARCH STUDY

We are looking for volunteers aged 5-18 years to participate in an online experiment to help us study how children learn to distinguish the left side of their body from the right.

It might seem trivial, but it’s an important question – being able to quickly identify parts of your body helps us to function normally in the world.

We can test this ability by showing people photographs of a hand and getting them to press a button if they think it is a left hand and a different button if they think it is a right hand. We call the test a ‘left/right judgment task’.

Knowing how long this takes on average, and therefore what is ‘normal’ will help us identify people who might require specific treatments to improve their functioning.

If you are aged between 5 and 18 year, or know someone who is, then click here to volunteer in this study.

Practical details of this experiment:

  • Location: At your computer, in your home
  • Duration of trial: Maximum of 20 minutes
  • What do I have to do? Perform an online task
  • What do you get? Benefits of future therapies which may result from the research
  • Children must have the permission of their parent/guardian to participate
  • You will be able to access our study/publications/blogs related to the experiment

Contact information: Dr James McAuley, Senior Research Officer, T: +612 9399 1273, E: j.mcauley@neura.edu.au

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