Balance_vision

Vision, Posture and Balance

RESEARCH STUDY

Vision, Posture and Balance Study (Optic Flow) – This study has now been completed

We asked – how good is your balance? Would you like to know your Falls Risk Score?

We asked for older adults to participate in this study looking at how vision influences posture and balance.

Participants were:

  • Aged 60 years and older
  • In fair to good health – good vision when wearing glasses, no neurological disorders
  • Able to stand for 60 seconds without a support

The aims of this study was to determine:

  1. 1. Whether balance, posture and standing body alignment and muscle activity are affected by vision differ between young and older people and between older people at low and high risk of falls
  2. 2. Whether an over-reliance on vision for balance control might increase the risk of falls

The study involved an assessment with a series of interesting tests evaluating your vision, strength, reaction time, sensation, balance and mobility.

All procedures are safe and are routinely used in clinical and research settings.

Study participants received an assessment report on their balance with recommendations for minimising the risk of falling.

The study was completed over a 2 hour session at Neuroscience Research Australia in Randwick, NSW.

 

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