Diabetic neuropathy

HEALTH INFORMATION

Improving treatment strategies for diabetic neuropathy

WHAT WE KNOW

Neuropathy is the medical term for damage to the nerves of the peripheral nervous system. Approximately 30% of neuropathies are ‘idiopathic’, meaning the cause is unknown. Diabetic neuropathy is usually as a result of serious complication from diabetes and usually damages nerves that are located in the legs and feet.

Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain or numbness in the extremities to problems with the digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal.

Most people with diabetic neuropathy are unaware that they have nerve damage, until it is picked up on routine screening by a doctor or when complications develop. Although there is no cure, early diagnosis and treatment can improve quality of life and reduce the risk of further complications. Diabetic neuropathy can be prevented, or its progress slowed, with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle.

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OUR LATEST RESEARCH

Restoring sensitivity in peripheral neuropathy

The elderly and patients with diabetes are at high risk of losing sensation in their feet and currently no treatment for this condition exists. This loss of feeling leads to falls, fractures and foot ulcers, which in many cases end with amputation. We have developed a new subsensory stimulation technique which for the first time restores lost sensation.

What else is happening in Diabetic neuropathy research at NeuRA?

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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