Dr Julie Brown and motorcyclist

Motorcycle safety

HEALTH INFORMATION

Ensuring motorcycle riders are kept safe on our roads

WHAT WE KNOW

As motorcycles and scooters become increasingly popular forms of transport, the number of riders injured and killed in motorcycle crashes is also increasing. Dr Julie Brown and her team are looking for ways to help reduce the pain and suffering as well as the healthcare burden associated with these crashes.

OUR LATEST RESEARCH

Motorcycle Safety Study

The purpose of this study is to develop effective policies and programs to address the current disproportionate involvement of motorcyclists in serious casualty crashes. There is a need to understand in detail the individual and interactive effects that environmental, vehicle and road user factors have on the involvement and injury outcome of motorcyclists in serious injury crashes.

This study has two distinct aims:
1. To develop an understanding of the influence of the total system, i.e. the rider, the vehicles and the crash
site on the nature and pattern of injuries sustained by seriously injured motorcyclists, and
2. To examine causal relationships between human, vehicle, road and other environmental factors and
motorcyclists involvement in serious injury crashes

In order to meet the objectives and aims of the study, the scope of this work involves the conduct of an in-depth study of motorcyclists who have been seriously injured in a crash on NSW roads with a review of the crashes conducted by our multi-disciplinary review team.

 

What else is happening in Motorcycle safety research at NeuRA?

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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