Dr Julie Brown and motorcyclist

Motorcycle safety

HEALTH INFORMATION

Ensuring motorcycle riders are kept safe on our roads

WHAT WE KNOW

As motorcycles and scooters become increasingly popular forms of transport, the number of riders injured and killed in motorcycle crashes is also increasing. Dr Julie Brown and her team are looking for ways to help reduce the pain and suffering as well as the healthcare burden associated with these crashes.

OUR LATEST RESEARCH

Motorcycle Safety Study

The purpose of this study is to develop effective policies and programs to address the current disproportionate involvement of motorcyclists in serious casualty crashes. There is a need to understand in detail the individual and interactive effects that environmental, vehicle and road user factors have on the involvement and injury outcome of motorcyclists in serious injury crashes.

This study has two distinct aims:
1. To develop an understanding of the influence of the total system, i.e. the rider, the vehicles and the crash
site on the nature and pattern of injuries sustained by seriously injured motorcyclists, and
2. To examine causal relationships between human, vehicle, road and other environmental factors and
motorcyclists involvement in serious injury crashes

In order to meet the objectives and aims of the study, the scope of this work involves the conduct of an in-depth study of motorcyclists who have been seriously injured in a crash on NSW roads with a review of the crashes conducted by our multi-disciplinary review team.

 

What else is happening in Motorcycle safety research at NeuRA?

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

'I've got the best job for you dad. Your shaky arm will be perfect for it!'

Children… honest and insightful. Their innocence warms the heart. But what words do you use to explain to a child that daddy has an incurable brain disease? What words tell them that in time he may not be able to play football in the park, let alone feed himself? What words help them understand that in the later stages, dementia may also strike? Aged just 36, this was the reality that faced Steve Hartley. Parkinson's disease didn't care he was a fit, healthy, a young dad and devoted husband. It also didn't seem to care his family had no history of it. The key to defeating Parkinson's disease is early intervention, and thanks to a global research team, led by NeuRA, we're pleased to announce that early intervention may be possible. Your support, alongside national and international foundations Shake it Up Australia and the Michael J Fox Foundation, researchers have discovered that a special protein, found in people with a family history of the disease increases prior to Parkinson’s symptoms developing. This is an incredible step forward, because it means that drug therapies, aimed at blocking the increase in the protein, can be administered much earlier – even before symptoms strike. The next step is to understand when to give the drug therapies and which people will most benefit from it. But we need your help. A gift today will support vital research and in time help medical professionals around the world treat Parkinson’s disease sooner, with much better health outcomes. Thank you, in advance, for your support.  
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