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Prosthetics

HEALTH INFORMATION

Restoring balance function

WHAT WE KNOW

A prosthesis is an artificial device that replaces a missing body part. Technologies are constantly being developed to actively aid or restore movement to individuals suffering from muscular impairments or weakness, neurologic injury, or amputations.

There are a wide variety of prefabricated and custom-made prostheses. Due to modern advances in technology, prostheses are becoming lighter, stronger and more naturally functioning. Technological advances include the ‘energy storing foot’, the ‘microprocessor controlled knee’ and the ‘myo-electric’ (bionic) hand.

Much like a cochlear implant restores auditory function, a vestibular prosthesis restores balance function.

What else is happening in Prosthetics research at NeuRA?

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

'I've got the best job for you dad. Your shaky arm will be perfect for it!'

Children… honest and insightful. Their innocence warms the heart. But what words do you use to explain to a child that daddy has an incurable brain disease? What words tell them that in time he may not be able to play football in the park, let alone feed himself? What words help them understand that in the later stages, dementia may also strike? Aged just 36, this was the reality that faced Steve Hartley. Parkinson's disease didn't care he was a fit, healthy, a young dad and devoted husband. It also didn't seem to care his family had no history of it. The key to defeating Parkinson's disease is early intervention, and thanks to a global research team, led by NeuRA, we're pleased to announce that early intervention may be possible. Your support, alongside national and international foundations Shake it Up Australia and the Michael J Fox Foundation, researchers have discovered that a special protein, found in people with a family history of the disease increases prior to Parkinson’s symptoms developing. This is an incredible step forward, because it means that drug therapies, aimed at blocking the increase in the protein, can be administered much earlier – even before symptoms strike. The next step is to understand when to give the drug therapies and which people will most benefit from it. But we need your help. A gift today will support vital research and in time help medical professionals around the world treat Parkinson’s disease sooner, with much better health outcomes. Thank you, in advance, for your support.  
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