Prosthetics

EXTRA INFORMATION

Restoring balance function

WHAT WE KNOW

Our Research

Non-Invasive Interfacing of Touch Sensors to Restore Tactile Sensation in Amputees

The dexterity of the human hand in object manipulation is unparalleled in the natural world. This dexterity is facilitated by an array of receptors embedded within the skin of each fingertip that provide information about the tactile world and informs the motor-control system. The loss of a hand or arm is a devastating event, and the aim of our new project is to develop a non-invasive prosthetic system that can provide sensory feedback in amputees to help guide movement of a prosthetic hand.

A new mouse model that determines the effects of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis on vestibular plasticity.

Much like a cochlear implant restores auditory function, a vestibular prosthesis restores balance function. It is not clear whether the limited results from vestibular prostheses is due the device not stimulating one component (the otoliths) of the vestibular system essential for self-repair. We will test mutant mice that lack otoliths to determine the importance of stimulating the otoliths in restoring function. This work will shape the future direction of prosthesis development.

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