Stress-related psychopathology

HEALTH INFORMATION

Stress and common biological mechanisms of psychotic and mood disorders

WHAT WE KNOW

Psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder) and mood disorders (e.g., bipolar disorder, major depression) are known to share genetic vulnerabilities and environmental risk factors that affect brain function and cognition. Our multidisciplinary approach to understanding the stress-related neurobiology of these severe and disabling psychiatric conditions sees collaboration among experts in cognition, neuroimaging, genetics, and bioinformatics working together on a number of specific projects which are listed below according to funding received.

OUR LATEST RESEARCH

Imaging Genetics in Psychosis Study

The Imaging-Genetics in Psychosis study aims to determine common stress-related pathology among schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, in association with shared genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive deficits, and brain phenotypes.

Epistatic genetic effects on brain structure in schizophrenia

This project uses data from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank to determine interactive genetic effects on brain structure and cognition in schizophrenia.

Epigenetic and childhood trauma in psychotic and mood disorder

This project examines epigenetic (methylation) markers of childhood trauma in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

Childhood trauma and inflammatory markers

This project examines immune and stress response markers in association with epigenetic markers and brain structure/function in psychotic disorders.

What else is happening in Stress-related psychopathology research at NeuRA?

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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