NeuRA Magazine #21

Feature Story

UNLOCKING THE REASONS FOR CHRONIC PAIN

Chronic pain is a significant problem worldwide and locally, impacting one in three Australians. It results in enormous suffering and costs to the individual, as well as their loved ones and society in general. Despite the availability of medications and other pain therapies, there is still no ideal treatment which benefits the majority of sufferers and most of the available therapies have significant side effects or risks of serious adverse events. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify, develop, and evaluate new chronic pain therapies.

Dr Sylvia Gustin’s research program addresses this need by developing and evaluating treatments which can provide pain relief via the primary source of pain: the human brain. Her research has identified biochemical, structural and functional alterations within the thalamus that are now known to play a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain.

The thalamus is a small structure within the brain located just above the brain stem and acts as a gateway to and from the cortex. Dr Gustin’s new approach targets these thalamic changes to ultimately treat chronic pain.

In a new study these thalamic changes will be modulated, which Dr Gustin hopes will lead to significant pain reduction. This teaches individuals to gain control over their brain activity in a way which reduces their pain. An important part of the program is a nested mechanisms study which applies causal mediation analysis to state-of-the-art brain imaging data so that the precise brain processes which underlie therapeutic change can be identified.

Part of the reason behind our inadequate ability to provide satisfactory pain relief in people with chronic pain is our limited understanding of the pathophysiology under
lying chronic pain. Consequently, it is important that we determine the mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

Research has identified anatomical changes within the medial prefrontal cortex in chronic pain sufferers. The medial prefrontal cortex is the brain’s major processing centre for emotions. In a new study, Dr Gustin will determine the nature of these anatomical changes using state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques.

The results from this study will provide vital information which will help to unlock the reasons for chronic pain. In addition, it will provide new information which is needed to develop pain drugs which specifically target discrete brain regions.

Current pain medications are not targeted and therefore have significant side effects or risks of adverse events.

 

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
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