NeuRA Magazine #21

YOUNG RESEARCHER AT WORK

Dr Anna Hudson, Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at NeuRA, has been awarded the Lung Foundation Australia/Boehringer Ingelheim Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Research Fellowship. One in seven Australians over forty is affected by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, a progressive disease which makes it hard to breathe and causes shortness of breath, progressing in its severity over time. People living with this disease usually experience coughing which produces large amounts of mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms.

 

Commenting on her fellowship award Anna said, “my research work over the next two years will focus on looking at the way respiratory muscles are controlled in people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease”.

 

“For most of us we rarely think about breathing – it is an automatic process, but for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, they are often short of breath.”

 

“I am going to use my knowledge in the techniques to measure muscle and brain activity to detect impairments in the neural control of breathing in these people”, said Dr Hudson.

 

This is a disease which affects the quality of life and the everyday living of people affected by it. By looking at how the neural control of their breathing muscles is affected, Dr Hudson hopes to identify new targets, therapies and techniques to support and improve the lives of people living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
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