NeuRA Magazine #22

Dementia Research

PREVALENCE OF DEMENTIA IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

Research led by Prof Tony Broe and Dr Kylie Radford has highlighted the high prevalence of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, in Aboriginal communities. We are working towards understanding the causes of cognitive decline and dementia, building capacity in dementia care and supporting Aboriginal family carers, and developing culturally appropriate strategies to promote healthy brain ageing.

The next decade will see a dramatic increase in the number and proportion of older people within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Close to 80% of these older people live in regional and urban parts of Australia (a third in our major cities). Recently, the Koori Growing Old Well Study (KGOWS) has shown that dementia prevalence in Aboriginal Australians across NSW is three times higher than the overall Australian population, at ages 60 years and older.

What is it that helps one person age successfully, and causes another to develop age-related diseases like dementia? Scientifically, we know too little about normal ageing and what factors influence some people, and not others, to develop diseases that affect the brain. Only by studying healthy elderly people, as well as those with problems, can we know what normal ageing looks like and learn more about staying healthy as we age. In collaboration with our Aboriginal community partners, our rigorous population- based approach allowed us to accurately assess the prevalence of dementia, not just those already ‘in the system’ and seeking treatment or care.

NeuRA’s Aboriginal health and ageing team, with collaborators, are now conducting a follow-up study (KGOWS-II) to determine the social and biomedical risk and protective factors for dementia across the lifespan. In 2016, NeuRA also initiated the Koori Active and Healthy Ageing Project. This research will develop effective, culturally appropriate, and accessible strategies to promote vitality and healthy brain ageing and prevent dementia in Aboriginal communities. This research is supported by NeuRA’s ongoing Koori Dementia Care Project, which aims to build capacity in dementia understanding and care with Aboriginal community controlled and mainstream service providers.

As one older Aboriginal participant observed: “Healthy ageing is your mind staying young”.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

StandingTall-Plus: a multifactorial program to prevent falls in older people

A cutting-edge research study on the effectiveness of a multifaceted program including balance exercise, brain training and cognitive behavioural therapy towards reducing falls. The StandingTall team, led by Associate Professor Kim Delbaere, has worked with over 500 community-dwelling older people since 2015, implementing a home-based balance exercise program delivered through a tablet computer. By embracing technology, we are providing an alternative exercise opportunity, which is engaging and using all the latest evidence to prevent falls. The program has been a success with our participants, evidenced by unprecedented levels of sustained adherence to prescribed balance exercises over two years. For our next research study, called “StandingTall-Plus”, we have added a cutting-edge brain training program to help people think faster on their feet during daily activities. We are also collaborating with the Black Dog Institute to offer online cognitive behavioural therapy to address depressive thoughts and low mood. All participants will be assessed using a comprehensive test battery of known falls risk factors across physical, cognitive and affective domains. This will then be used to offer each participant a fully tailored program that is suited to their abilities and circumstances. Our primary aim is to reduce the number of falls over a 12-month follow-up period when compared to a health promotion program. We are currently recruiting for the StandingTall-Plus research study, for more information visit: https://www.neura.edu.au/clinical-trial/standingtall-plus/
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