NeuRA Magazine #22

LEAVING A LEGACY OF DISCOVERY

Keith and Lucille had never considered how medical research could benefit from the donation of a brain until their world came crashing down. After noticing changes
in her husband, it was revealed that Keith was living with frontotemporal dementia. About one year later, he was also diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. They desperately wanted to help future generations, and decided together that the best way to do that was through brain donation. They knew their precious gift would not only be of tremendous value to researchers now, but that it would create a legacy of discovery for years to come. After Keith’s passing and subsequent donation, an examination of his brain revealed that he was in fact not living with Parkinson’s disease, but had lived with both frontotemporal dementia and the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. These types of findings are crucial in helping researchers and clinicians better diagnose and treat a wide range of brain diseases and is an key part of the reason why Lucille and Keith thought it important to bequest their brains to science at the Sydney Brain Bank.

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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