NeuRA Magazine #26

New report

NEW REPORT REVEALS OSTEOPOROSIS CARE GAP

Professor Jacqueline Close, Geriatrician and Co-Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Hip Fracture Registry (ANZHFR) based at NeuRA with Orthopaedic surgeon Professor Ian Harris, recently released findings from the 2018 Hip fracture Registry that showed Australia is still significantly behind other countries in closing the osteoporosis care gap.

Data from the report produced by the Australian and New Zealand Hip Fracture Registry, based at NeuRA, shows only 25 per cent of hip fracture patients leave hospital on active treatment for osteoporosis and only 24 per cent of hospitals provide individualised written information on prevention of future falls and fractures.

“There are huge opportunities to further improve hip fracture care including the prevention of future falls and fractures. Strong evidence exists to support treatment of osteoporosis in this population yet all too frequently we fail to offer treatments which can impact on people’s lives,” said Professor Close.

Professor Harris said hospitals are now sharing their waiting times from arrival to surgery, helping to generate a more transparent snapshot of performance against a national standard.

“Currently the most common delay for people waiting more than 48 hours for surgery is access to operating theatre time. This is something we must address,” said Professor Harris.

Professor Harris, Orthopaedic Surgeon and Co-Chair of the ANZHFR, said data is a powerful driver of change in the health system. “The Registry is run by clinicians for clinicians and provides hospitals with real-time performance data, allowing them to see how they perform against other hospitals.”

Although the incidence of minimal trauma hip fracture has decreased over time, the actual number of hip fractures continues to increase due to the rising number of older adults. Current projections suggest that by 2022 there will be more than 30,000 hip fractures each year with a projected cost of $1.126 billion. Minimal trauma fractures are relatively common in people aged 50 and over.

It is estimated that, for Australians in this age group, one in four men and two in five women will experience a minimal trauma fracture. A hip fracture is one of the most serious types of minimal trauma fracture. In 2015-16, approximately 22,000 people aged 50 and over were hospitalised for a minimal trauma hip fracture with the need for hospitalisation highest for those aged over 85.

Women were one and a half times more likely than men to be admitted to hospital with a hip fracture.

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

LEAD!- Leveraging Evidence into Action on Dementia

Currently, there is no effective treatment for dementia, highlighting the urgent need to preventing more cases through evidence-based strategies for risk reduction. As there is an overlap between the risk factors for dementia and other preventable non-communicable diseases including stroke, diabetes, and heart disease, it is important to build upon proven risk-reduction strategies. What is LEAD? LEAD! is a project funded by the NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Grant led by Professor Kaarin Anstey. It involves an international collaboration between leading academics, clinicians, consumers, and community members. Organisations involved include the Department of Health, WHO, Dementia Australia, Alzheimer’s Disease International, Diabetes Australia, and Heart Foundation. The project aims to translate dementia research and implement evidence-based strategies for dementia risk reduction to individuals, communities, and healthcare centres. Three workstreams The project has three concurrent workstreams over five years: Development, Implementation, and Evaluation and adoption. The Development stream, led by Professor Kaarin Anstey and Associate Professor Peters, focuses on building a new tool for predicting dementia and other non-communicable diseases including stroke, diabetes or myocardial infarction. The tool will be available to the public, researchers and clinicians. It will save clinical assessment time, accurately predict multiple outcomes and will be more acceptable in comparison to using individual tools for each disease outcome. The Implementation stream led by Professor Nicola Lautenschalger’s team at the University of Melbourne, will develop strategies to support the implementation of dementia risk reduction evidence by engaging with consumers, clinicians, policy makers, and the public. The stream will develop strategies for incorporating the new risk assessment tool into various technological platforms (e.g., websites or apps). The Evaluation and adoption stream, led by Professor Anstey and in collaboration with Professor Louisa Jorm and Dr Heidi Welberry at UNSW, focuses on measuring trajectories of Australian’s national risk factor profiles for multiple chronic diseases. Collaboration with key stakeholders including the WHO will help build an evaluation framework and methodology for implementing evidence on dementia risk reduction based on WHO guidelines at national level and in the global context.
PROJECT