NeuRA Magazine #26

Research

BREAKTHROUGH IN CLEFT LIP AND PALATE RESEARCH

An international research collaboration between Australia and the USA, led by Associate Professor Roscioli at NeuRA has identified new genes that cause cleft lip and palate. The genes, associated for the first time with cleft lip and palate, encode proteins that work together in a network, providing important insights into the biological basis of one of the most common physical malformations.

Representing about 70 per cent of cleft lip and palate cases worldwide, non-syndromic cleft lip and palate typically occurs in isolation without other physical abnormalities. This craniofacial malformation has long been considered to be caused by a combination of many common genetic variants and environmental factors, each contributing a small amount to the risk of a child being born with a cleft.

Using next generation sequencing, the research team identified variants in four new genes, each representing a primary cause of non-syndromic cleft lip and palate. Variants in these genes were found to account for 15 per cent of the families who took part in the study and in nearly three per cent of a second, larger group of smaller families and isolated cases.

Published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, the study provides the first evidence that a significant number of non-syndromic clefts have a single gene basis and not a complex basis as previously thought.

Associate Prof Tony Roscioli said cleft lip/palate is one of the most common human malformations, occurring in one in 800 children.

“That equates to about 250 Australian children each year and one affected child born every three minutes worldwide,” said Associate Prof Roscioli.

“Knowing the genes and the way these impact lip and palate formation opens the door for further research to understand how these genes work and to develop treatments.”

Cleft lip and cleft palates are repaired with corrective surgery. Future research will investigate the biology and link the findings to potential therapies. These discoveries will allow geneticists to provide more accurate information to families.

Associate Professor Tony Roscioli is a specialist in clinical genetics at the Sydney Children’s Hospital and leads the Sydney Partnership for Health Education Research and Enterprise (SPHERE) GenomeConnect clinical academic stream. At NeuRA he leads the Centre for Research Excellence in Neurocognitive Disorders where he endeavours to transform the diagnosis and management of intellectual disability through genomics.

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
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