NeuRA-Profile-2016 - page 16

ProfRhoshel Lenroot ispart of a large,
multi-disciplinary teamwhich seeks
to improve thecurrent treatments for
childrenwithconduct problems suchas
aggressivebehaviours.Oneof themost
effectiveways to treat earlyconduct
problems is throughevidence-based
parent trainingprograms. Researchhas
shown that participation reduces the
early signsof violenceandantisocial
behaviour inchildren. Themajority
of participants in theseprograms
aremothers, but there is evidence to
show that childrendisplaygreater
improvements inbehaviourwhen
fathersparticipate in treatment, and
that thebenefits aremaintained for
a longer periodof time.
TheLikeFatherLikeSon:ANational
Approach toViolence,Antisocial
Behaviourand theMentalHealthof
MenandBoys
project investigates
innovative strategies for enhancing
engagement of fathers inevidence-
based interventions for childhood
conduct problems at thenational level.
“Somebarriersmayhave todowith
malegender roles, wheredads assume
that dealingwith thechildren falls in
themother’sdomain.Or therecouldbe
practical impediments,” saysProf Lenroot.
Thefirst step is anational surveyof
fathers todetermine thebarriers to
involvement anddesign initiatives to
overcome those. “Some initial research
shows amuchhigher percentageof
fathersparticipating if thereareways for
them todo so.”After-hours consultations
and tailoring interventionprogramswill
better appeal to fathers. The
LikeFather
Childhoodconductproblemsare thegreatest
risk factor forantisocial behaviourandviolence,
aswell as lateradultmental health issues.
LIKE FATHER LIKE SON
Research shows that
parentingprograms are
moreeffectivewhen
fathersparticipate
LikeSon
projectwill developAustralia’s
first free, nationalweb-basedparenting
program toallowparents access to
tips and strategies. Theprogramwill
alsodesigna trainingprogram for
practitioners toequip themwith skills
tocustomise interventions tomeet each
family’suniqueneeds.
If youare interested in further
informationabout theproject, go to:
likefatherlikeson.com.au
Somebarriersmayhave to
dowithmalegender roles,
wheredadsassume that
dealingwith thechildren falls
in themother’sdomain.
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