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NEWS AND MEDIA

Collaborate with researchers on healthy ageing in Australia

By 2053, 8.3 million Australians will be aged 65 and over, and 1.6 million people will be aged over 85. This unprecedented demographic shift will result in dramatic changes in the need for health and care services. An upcoming public symposium on healthy ageing is calling for community input to provide valuable insight into healthy ageing.   NeuRA’s Professor Kaarin Anstey is the keynote speaker at the 2019 Australian Frontiers of Science Symposia focused on ‘redefining healthy ageing together’ from 8-9 April. Professor Anstey leads an innovative multi-disciplinary team to determine vital community lifestyle solutions that address healthy ageing and…

New research program to target reduction of falls in people with Parkinson’s disease

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and UNSW Sydney have published encouraging results of their reactive balance training program that shows a 60 per cent risk reduction in falls due to trips and slips in older adults, in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences. This program is now being replicated to help those with Parkinson’s disease, and early indicators show promising results. The reactive balance training program works on a retraining-the-brain protocol developed from learning on a purpose-built slip-and-trip walkway, the only one of its kind in the world.  Participants, supported by a safety harness walk along a pathway which…

NeuRA’s online platform delivers neuroscience research to regional Australia

 Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) has launched an online destination to make the latest information on neuroscience research, discoveries and treatments more accessible for those in rural or remote areas. The NeuRAtalks platform provides a unique opportunity for those living in remote areas to view seminars on a range of neuroscience topics from mental health, pain, ageing and neurodegeneration, to specific diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, dementia. The platform carries a series of seminars around 15 minutes in duration by leading scientists in their field of research, including recent discoveries, research direction and clinical trials. NeuRA CEO Professor Peter Schofield said…

Neuroscience research attracts Australia Day Award

Congratulations to Professor Peter R Schofield AO FAHMS PhD DSc   Professor Peter Schofield CEO of Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), Professor of Medicine at UNSW and Interim Joint CEO of the Mindgardens Alliance, has been recognised in the 2019 Australia Day Awards as an Officer of the Order of Australia “for distinguished service to medical and scientific research in the field of neuroscience, and to professional institutions”. Professor Schofield has dedicated his life to research and discovery in the field of neuroscience, with a focus on ageing and neurodegeneration, specifically dementia and mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. Professor Schofield has inspired…

Study on perceived hand size holds key to understanding brain-hand communication

Researchers from Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and UNSW Sydney have released a new study in PLOS One on the proprioceptive measurements of perceived hand position using pointing and verbal localisation tasks. The study has the potential to assist researchers in understanding brain-to-hand communication in Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS) and people who have had strokes. Previous studies revealed that healthy individuals consistently misjudge the size and shape of their hidden hand when they are asked to locate an object. Specifically, they overestimate the width of their hand and underestimate the length of their fingers. This would also imply that the…

Global collaboration drives new blood test to predict genetic Alzheimer’s disease

Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), part of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), has collaborated on a publication in Nature Medicine released today, that details evidence for a blood test that can predict familial Alzheimer disease 16 years before clinical symptoms appear. The DIAN study which has been running since 2008, received support funding for this phase of research from the National Institute of Ageing and the German Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases. It involves a global network of researchers, led by Professors John Morris and Randall Bateman at Washington University, St Louis, Missouri with study sites in the USA, England, Germany and three…