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NEWS AND MEDIA

Australian research shows air pollution associated with higher risk of dementia globally

Australian researchers have conducted the first global study to find a clear link between air pollution and an increased risk of getting dementia later in life. The study printed today in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease by Dr Ruth Peters at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), brings together research on people living in regions of Canada, Sweden, Taiwan, United Kingdom and the United States. The research shows that rates of dementia were more likely when people were exposed over a long period of time to two types of air pollutants; particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) and nitrous oxides (NOx). Particulate matter 2.5…

New Australian invention can predict falls among older people with 75% accuracy

Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and Mark Moran Group (MMG) have partnered to help older Australians benefit from the latest breakthroughs in medical research. This exciting new alliance between NeuRA and MMG provides unique opportunities to deliver ground-breaking health and wellness innovations to help older Australians live better and healthier for longer. The first stage of the partnership includes the development and rollout of a new app-based wellbeing assessment tool, which features more than 30 years of NeuRA’s research involving about 20,000 participants aimed at maximising the physical and psychological wellbeing of older people. The FallScreen+ app tests people aged over…

Older driver safety compromised by seat cushions and pillows

New research has found that common accessories typically used by older Australians to improve comfort in cars may increase the chance of injury during a crash. Researchers at the Transurban Road Safety Centre at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) conducted more than 130 crash test simulations using a wide range of car seat accessories and found that some types of accessories may pose health risks. These accessories include items that some drivers use to sit on, or place between their back and the seat, such as seat base cushions, seat back cushions, back support or head-rest cushions. “Around a quarter of…

NeuRA welcomes new funding to tackle Alzheimer’s

Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) welcomes the announcement by Health Minister Greg Hunt to provide $21 million to fund 13 research projects to help tackle dementia. The new funding includes a project led by Professor Kaarin Anstey from NeuRA and UNSW to develop risk assessment tools for doctors and researchers that will help determine someone’s likelihood of developing dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease), diabetes and stroke. The $2 million project will support development of online tools can be used by people around the world to determine which lifestyle or health factors they may need to better manage in order to achieve healthy…

NeuRA Awards and Scholarships 2019

NeuRA would like to congratulate the following students and postdoctoral researchers recognised at the scholarships and awards event held in NeuRA’s John and Betty Lynch Seminar Room earlier this week.   Dr Matthew Brodie The Michael & Elizabeth Gilbert Postgraduate Fellowship in Parkinson’s Disease Research Dr Jasmine Menant The Michael & Elizabeth Gilbert Postgraduate Fellowship in Parkinson’s Disease Research Dr Daina Sturnieks Rising Star Researcher Fellowship Dr Claire Shepherd The Grant Broadcasting Fellowship Dr Jan Fullerton The Janette Mary O’Neil Research Fellowship Dr Hanna Hensen The Hicksons Lawyers Postgraduate Scholarship Oliver Watkeys The Edward C Dunn Foundation Postgraduate Scholarship Angeliki…

What do Aboriginal Australians want from their aged care system? Community connection is number one

Written by Professor Tony Broe, Senior Principal Research Fellow at NeuRA. Originally published by The Conversation.  The Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is ageing at a much faster rate than the non-Indigenous population. Aboriginal Australians record high mid-life rates of multiple chronic diseases including heart disease and stroke, lung disease, and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, for example, is more than twice as common in the Indigenous population than the non-Indigenous population. Aboriginal Australians also experience higher rates of dementia in later life – three to four times the rates seen in non-Indigenous people. There remains a life expectancy gap of around ten years between…