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NEWS AND MEDIA

Can humans live to 150?

The international Living to 100 Conference was recently held in Sydney hosted by the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), UNSW Sydney. The conference brought together leaders in the field of ageing from around the globe to debate and unravel the secrets of successful ageing. The internationally acclaimed line up of speakers included NeuRA’s CEO Professor Peter Schofield, NeuRA Senior Research Scientist, Dr Karen Mather and NeuRA Senior Research Facility Manager, Dr Claire Shepherd. Over the two-day conference, experts deliberated on the latest research on exceptionally long-lived individuals, in particular centenarians and supercentenarians. But the question on everyone’s lips was…

Schizophrenia breakthrough

In one of the biggest breakthroughs in schizophrenia research in recent times, Professor Cynthia Shannon Weickert at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) has identified immune cells in greater amounts in the brains of some people with schizophrenia. The study published today in Molecular Psychiatry has the potential to transform global schizophrenia research and open new avenues for developing targeted immune cell therapies. One in every 100 Australians lives with schizophrenia. No single cause of schizophrenia has been identified, and this has prevented the development of a cure. The current treatments for schizophrenia are designed to suppress symptoms rather than target underlying…

Calls to prioritise osteoporosis plans for hip fracture patients leaving hospital

The Australian and New Zealand Hip Fracture Registry based at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), released its 2018 report today and the authors are calling for hospitals to make osteoporosis plans a priority for patients leaving hospital after a hip fracture. Data from the report shows only 25 per cent of hip fracture patients leave hospital on active treatment for osteoporosis and only 24 per cent of hospitals provide individualised written information on prevention of future falls and fractures.    Commenting on the report, Professor Jacqueline Close, Geriatrician and Co-Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Hip Fracture Registry (ANZHFR) said…

Do you want to reduce your risk of dementia?

Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) will be hosting a FREE seminar on dementia at Mittagong RSL on Monday, 3 September from 10:00am-1.00pm. The event includes a series of four short seminars and a question and answer panel where audience participation is encouraged. The health, economic and personal impact of dementia is staggering. In Australia, there are over 1,500 new cases of dementia diagnosed each week. It’s predicted that there will be almost one million Australians with the condition by 2050 and this will impact 10 times as many family members and friends. This unprecedented demographic shift will result in dramatic changes…

Virtual Reality Intervention

International collaboration between NeuRA and University of Alabama, USA A person with a complete spinal cord injury cannot feel touch. Recent research findings from NeuRA’s Dr Sylvia Gustin have shown evidence for a new category where touch information is being forwarded from the periphery (e.g. the big toe) to the brain despite the patient not being able to ‘feel’ the sensation. This new category, called ‘discomplete spinal cord injury’, requires a new approach to rehabilitation. Together with Corey Shum and Associate Professor Zina Trost (University of Alabama, USA), Dr Gustin is developing a novel approach of Virtual Reality Walking Intervention…

4,000 Australian seniors hospitalised each year from ladder falls

Every year, over 4,000 Australians are hospitalised following a fall from a ladder with men aged 60-64 being the most susceptible. The Falls, Balance and Injury research centre at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) is conducting an innovative study to understand falls-risk while using ladders and creating strategies to prevent serious injury. “A fall from a ladder can change your life forever, especially when you are in your retirement phase and have a bucket list of activities to explore with your extra time,” said Senior Principal Research Scientist Professor Stephen Lord. “Falls from a ladder can cause serious injuries to your…