Digitally created image of brain in skull

ForeFront

RESEARCH CENTRE

About us

ForeFront provides a unique combination of clinical and laboratory-based research which together aim to unravel the mechanisms behind frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and motor neurone disease (MND) and help to develop effective treatments.

ForeFront comprises two government funded research groups across four themes:

FTD and MND NHMRC Program grant

  1. Neuropathology
  2. Animal modelling and cellular/molecular biology
  3. Neurological research clinics

Memory node of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders

  1. Cognition and neuroimaging

Who’s involved?

Neuropathology

What regions and cell types are vulnerable? What proteins are affected?

Prof Glenda Halliday and Professor Jillian Kril

Animal modelling and cellular/molecular biology

What proteins are toxic and how do they cause pathogenesis? What cells are vulnerability and how can we prevent this?
Professor Jürgen Götz and Assoc. Professor Lars Ittner

Clinical

How does the disease spread through the brain? How can we develop identification tools and test symptomatic treatments?

Prof John Hodges and Prof Matthew Kiernan

Cognition and neuroimaging

What brain functions are impaired? What brain areas are impaired and which functions do they subserve?

Assoc Professor Olivier Piguet and Dr Michael Hornberger

For more information on the clinical aspects of these disease click here

For more information on the laboratory-based research on these diseases click here

 

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
APPEAL

Brain and Knee Muscle Weakness Study

Why Does Quadriceps Weakness Persist after Total Knee Replacement? An Exploration of Neurophysiological Mechanisms Total knee replacement is a commonly performed surgery for treating end-staged knee osteoarthritis. Although most people recover well after surgery, weakness of the quadriceps muscles (the front thigh muscles) persists long after the surgery (at least for 12 months), despite intensive physiotherapy and exercise. Quadriceps muscle weakness is known to be associated with more severe pain and greatly affect daily activities. This study aims to investigate the mechanisms underlying weakness of the quadriceps muscles in people with knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement. We hope to better understand the relationship between the changes of the brain and a loss of quadriceps muscle strength after total knee replacement. The study might be a good fit for you if you: Scheduled to undergo a total knee replacement; The surgery is scheduled within the next 4 weeks; Do not have a previous knee joint replacement in the same knee; Do not have high tibial osteotomy; Do not have neurological disorders, epilepsy, psychiatric conditions, other chronic pain conditions; Do not have metal implants in the skull; Do not have a loss of sensation in the limbs. If you decide to take part you would: Be contacted by the researcher to determine your eligibility for the study Be scheduled for testing if you are eligible and willing to take part in the study Sign the Consent Form when you attend the first testing session Attend 3 testing sessions (approximately 2 hours per session): 1) before total knee replacement, 2) 3 months and 3) 6 months after total knee replacement. The testing will include several non-invasive measures of brain representations of the quadriceps muscles, central pain mechanisms, and motor function and questionnaires. Will I be paid to take part in the research study? You will be reimbursed ($50.00 per session) for travel and parking expenses associated with the research study visits. If you would like more information or are interested in being part of the study, please contact: Name: Dr Wei-Ju Chang Email: w.chang@neura.edu.au Phone: 02 9399 1260 This research is being funded by the Physiotherapy Research Foundation.  
PROJECT