Digitally created image of brain in skull

ForeFront

RESEARCH CENTRE

About us

ForeFront provides a unique combination of clinical and laboratory-based research which together aim to unravel the mechanisms behind frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and motor neurone disease (MND) and help to develop effective treatments.

ForeFront comprises two government funded research groups across four themes:

FTD and MND NHMRC Program grant

  1. Neuropathology
  2. Animal modelling and cellular/molecular biology
  3. Neurological research clinics

Memory node of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders

  1. Cognition and neuroimaging

Who’s involved?

Neuropathology

What regions and cell types are vulnerable? What proteins are affected?

Prof Glenda Halliday and Professor Jillian Kril

Animal modelling and cellular/molecular biology

What proteins are toxic and how do they cause pathogenesis? What cells are vulnerability and how can we prevent this?
Professor Jürgen Götz and Assoc. Professor Lars Ittner

Clinical

How does the disease spread through the brain? How can we develop identification tools and test symptomatic treatments?

Prof John Hodges and Prof Matthew Kiernan

Cognition and neuroimaging

What brain functions are impaired? What brain areas are impaired and which functions do they subserve?

Assoc Professor Olivier Piguet and Dr Michael Hornberger

For more information on the clinical aspects of these disease click here

For more information on the laboratory-based research on these diseases click here

 

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Caress the Detail: A Comprehensive MRI Atlas of the in Vivo Human Brain

This project aims to deliver the most comprehensive, detailed and stereotaxically accurate MRI atlas of the canonical human brain. In human neuroscience, researchers and clinicians almost always investigate images obtained from living individuals. Yet, there is no satisfactory MRI atlas of the human brain in vivo or post-mortem. There are some population-based atlases, which valiantly solve a number of problems, but they fail to address major needs. Most problematically, they segment only a small number of brain structures, typically about 50, and they are of limited value for the interpretation of a single subject/patient. In contrast to population-based approaches, the present project will investigate normal, living subjects in detail. We aim to define approximately 800 structures, as in the histological atlas of Mai, Majtanik and Paxinos (2016), and, thus, provide a “gold standard” for science and clinical practice. We will do this by obtaining high-resolution MRI at 3T and 7T of twelve subjects through a collaboration with Markus Barth from the Centre for Advanced Imaging at the University of Queensland (UQ). The limited number of subjects will allow us to image each for longer periods, obtaining higher resolution and contrast, and to invest the required time to produce unprecedented detail in segmentation. We will produce an electronic atlas for interpreting MR images, both as a tablet application and as an online web service. The tablet application will provide a convenient and powerful exegesis of brain anatomy for researchers and clinicians. The open access web service will additionally provide images, segmentation and anatomical templates to be used with most common MR-analysis packages (e.g., SPM, FSL, MINC, BrainVoyager). This will be hosted in collaboration with UQ, supporting and complementing their population-based atlas.
PROJECT