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The Motor Neurone Disease Behaviour Scale (MiND)

The Motor Neurone Disease Behaviour Scale (MiND-B) is a valid, sensitive and short instrument that detects and quantifies behavioural changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). It measures three behavioural domains: apathy, disinhibition and stereotypical behaviour. The questionnaire contains 9 questions with a total score of 36, which higher scores denoting absence or very mild behavioural symptoms. The MiND-B can be completed by a caregiver/family member or clinician.

The MiND instrument and scoring guide can be downloaded below:

MiND-B Administration (PDF)
MiND-B Scoring Guide (PDF)

References
Wear, H.J., et al., The Cambridge Behavioural Inventory revised. Dementia & Neuropsychologia, 2008. 2(2): p. 102-107.
Neumann, M., et al., Ubiquitinated TDP-43 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Science, 2006. 314(5796): p. 130-3.
Lillo, P., et al., Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: A behavioural and cognitive continuum. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, 2012. 13(1): p. 102-9.
Lillo, P., et al., Grey and white matter changes across the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia continuum. PLoS ONE, 2012. 7(8): p. e43993.
Stewart, H., et al., Clinical and pathological features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutation in the C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p. Acta Neuropathologica, 2012. 123(3): p. 409-17.
Mioshi, E., et al., Neuropsychiatric changes precede classic motor symptoms in ALS and do not affect survival. Neurology, 2014. 82(2): p. 149-55.
Mioshi, E., et al., A novel tool to detect behavioural symptoms in ALS. Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener, 2014. 15(3-4): p. 298-304.
Hsieh, S., et al., The Mini-Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination: A new assessment tool for dementia. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 2014. 39(1-2): p. 1-11.

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Ten siblings. One third live (or have passed away) with dementia.

The scourge of dementia runs deep in Lorna Clement's family. Of the eleven children her dear parents raised, four live (or have passed away) with complications of the disease. Her mother also died of Alzheimer's disease, bringing the family total to five. This is the mystery of dementia - One family, with two very different ageing outcomes. You will have read that lifestyle is an important factor in reducing the risk of dementia. We also know diet is a key factor, and an aspect that Dr Ruth Peter's is exploring at NeuRA. Along with leading teams delivering high profile evidence synthesis work in the area of dementia risk reduction, Dr Peters has a particular interest in hypertension (that is, high blood pressure) and in the treatment of hypertension in older adults. “We have known for a while that treating high blood pressure reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but it is becoming clearer that controlling blood pressure may also help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Now we need to know what the best blood pressure is to protect brain health.” You are invited to read more about Lorna's story and Dr Peter's work, by clicking 'Read the full story' below. Please support dementia research at NeuRA Will you consider a gift today to help Dr Peter's unlock the secrets of healthy ageing and reduce the risk of dementia? Research into ageing and dementia at NeuRA will arm doctors and other medical professionals with the tools they need to help prevent dementia in our communities. Thank you for your support.
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