Digitally created image of brain in skull

ForeFront

RESEARCH CENTRE

Students

The program aims to provide rigour and excellence in laboratory and clinical research training to the next generation of clinical researchers.

From the laboratory perspective, we will continue to train PhD and honours students through university academic programs, and to mentor postdoctoral researchers to develop into independent scientists. We will disseminate the wide range of experimental techniques and model systems that are used in this program to train the next generation of molecular neuroscientists.

From the clinical perspective, we propose to expand the current personnel by supporting clinical fellows, provide for PhD scholarship stipends, in addition to funding a dedicated clinical research neuropsychologist, occupational therapist, speech pathologist, clinical nurse specialist, exercise physiologist and database manager. As such, the program will train clinical researchers and will facilitate development of career paths that encompass integrated neuroscience and clinical skills. This strategy will ensure an emerging cohort of clinician researchers who can facilitate translation of neuroscience findings into clinical practice and, importantly, optimise public health benefits by disseminating most recent evidence-based practice to community settings. Each clinician researcher will be trained in an interdisciplinary culture, co-supervised by investigators with different areas of expertise, thereby promoting integration of diverse approaches.

Prof Kril has academic expertise in research student training (Assoc Dean, Postgraduate Studies, Sydney Medical School) and will take prime responsibility for developing and overseeing training and mentoring within the program with the remit to substantially grow our capacity in this area.

For more information on how to get involved with either the clinical or laboratory based research please contact jillian.kril@sydney.edu.au.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

The cold case of schizophrenia - broken wide open!

‘It is like they were miraculously healed!’’ Schizophrenia is diagnosed by clinical observation of behaviour and speech. This is why NeuRA researchers are working hard to understand the biological basis of the illness. Through hours of work and in collaboration with doctors and scientists here and around the world, NeuRA has made an amazing breakthrough. For the first time, researchers have discovered the presence of antibodies in the brains of people who lived with schizophrenia. Having found these antibodies, it has led NeuRA researchers to ask two questions. What are they doing there? What should we do about the antibodies– help or remove them? This is a key breakthrough. Imagine if we are treating schizophrenia all wrong! It is early days, but can you imagine the treatment implications if we’ve identified a new biological basis for the disease? It could completely change the way schizophrenia is managed, creating new treatments that will protect the brain. More than this, could we be on the verge of discovering a ‘curable’ form of schizophrenia? How you can help We are so grateful for your loyal support of schizophrenia research in Australia, and today I ask if you will consider a gift today. Or, to provide greater confidence, consider becoming a Discovery Partner by making a monthly commitment. We believe there is great potential to explore these findings. Will you help move today’s breakthrough into tomorrow’s cure? To read more about this breakthrough, click ‘read the full story’ below. You are also invited to read ‘Beth’s story’, whose sweet son Marcus lived with schizophrenia, by clicking here.
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