Digitally created image of brain in skull

ForeFront

RESEARCH CENTRE

Students

The program aims to provide rigour and excellence in laboratory and clinical research training to the next generation of clinical researchers.

From the laboratory perspective, we will continue to train PhD and honours students through university academic programs, and to mentor postdoctoral researchers to develop into independent scientists. We will disseminate the wide range of experimental techniques and model systems that are used in this program to train the next generation of molecular neuroscientists.

From the clinical perspective, we propose to expand the current personnel by supporting clinical fellows, provide for PhD scholarship stipends, in addition to funding a dedicated clinical research neuropsychologist, occupational therapist, speech pathologist, clinical nurse specialist, exercise physiologist and database manager. As such, the program will train clinical researchers and will facilitate development of career paths that encompass integrated neuroscience and clinical skills. This strategy will ensure an emerging cohort of clinician researchers who can facilitate translation of neuroscience findings into clinical practice and, importantly, optimise public health benefits by disseminating most recent evidence-based practice to community settings. Each clinician researcher will be trained in an interdisciplinary culture, co-supervised by investigators with different areas of expertise, thereby promoting integration of diverse approaches.

Prof Kril has academic expertise in research student training (Assoc Dean, Postgraduate Studies, Sydney Medical School) and will take prime responsibility for developing and overseeing training and mentoring within the program with the remit to substantially grow our capacity in this area.

For more information on how to get involved with either the clinical or laboratory based research please contact jillian.kril@sydney.edu.au.

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

'I've got the best job for you dad. Your shaky arm will be perfect for it!'

Children… honest and insightful. Their innocence warms the heart. But what words do you use to explain to a child that daddy has an incurable brain disease? What words tell them that in time he may not be able to play football in the park, let alone feed himself? What words help them understand that in the later stages, dementia may also strike? Aged just 36, this was the reality that faced Steve Hartley. Parkinson's disease didn't care he was a fit, healthy, a young dad and devoted husband. It also didn't seem to care his family had no history of it. The key to defeating Parkinson's disease is early intervention, and thanks to a global research team, led by NeuRA, we're pleased to announce that early intervention may be possible. Your support, alongside national and international foundations Shake it Up Australia and the Michael J Fox Foundation, researchers have discovered that a special protein, found in people with a family history of the disease increases prior to Parkinson’s symptoms developing. This is an incredible step forward, because it means that drug therapies, aimed at blocking the increase in the protein, can be administered much earlier – even before symptoms strike. The next step is to understand when to give the drug therapies and which people will most benefit from it. But we need your help. A gift today will support vital research and in time help medical professionals around the world treat Parkinson’s disease sooner, with much better health outcomes. Thank you, in advance, for your support.  
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