Centre for Pain IMPACT

RESEARCH CENTRE

INVESTIGATING MECHANISMS OF PAIN TO ADVANCE CLINICAL TRANSLATION

The Centre for Pain IMPACT, directed by Prof James McAuleyA/Prof Sylvia Gustin, Dr Siobhan Schabrun and A/Prof David Seminowicz conducts research that encompasses basic science through to clinical and translational research.

Our research investigates the causes of chronic pain; develops and tests the efficacy and effectiveness of new treatment approaches; and implements new treatment approaches into clinical practice.

The research covers a range of conditions: low back pain, osteoarthritis, temporomandibular disorder, focal hand dystonia, headache, complex regional pain syndrome, migraine, burning mouth syndrome, sickle cell disease, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal cord injury neuropathic pain, trigeminal neuropathic pain and trigeminal neuralgia.

Our team uses different research methods, including animal (rodent) models, human models, neuroimaging, experimental methods (non-invasive brain stimulation, quantitative sensory testing), cohort studies, randomised controlled trials, implementation trials, and qualitative research.

The Centre also provides ongoing pain-related educational activities, including media, public lectures, clinical workshops, and seminars.

The overarching aims of the Centre for IMPACT are to:

  • profile NeuRA’s world class pain research
  • facilitate collaboration within and beyond NeuRA
  • raise awareness of NeuRA’s pain activities by providing:
    • a platform for research participant recruitment
    • a forum for public and clinician education
    • leverage expertise within NeuRA to seek external funding support (e.g. NHMRC CRE, industry, philanthropy).

LATEST NEWS AND EVENTS

Back and Neck Pain Forum

Please follow this link to the Back & Neck Pain Forum official webpage!

 

 


CENTRE FOR PAIN IMPACT TEAM

NELL NORMAN-NOTT PhD Student

BROOKE NAYLOR Masters Student, Clinical Psychology

DANIEL HULTBERG Medical Student

ANTON PAULSON Medical Student

DAVID KANG Medical Student

PAULINE ZAHARA Research Assistant

YANNICK GILANYI Research Associate : y.gilanyi@neura.edu.au

BRISHNA SHAH Research Associate : b.shah@neura.edu.au

JACK DEVONSHIRE Honours Student : j.devonshire@neura.edu.au

HARRISON HANSFORD Honours Student : h.hansford@neura.edu.au

THIAGO FOLLY Research Assistant

ANIKA HAIGH Research Assistant : a.haigh@neura.edu.au

DR IAN SKINNER Postdoctoral Research Fellow

LUKE JENKINS PhD Student

REBECCA LIVINGS PhD Student

WEI-JU CHANG Postdoctoral Fellow

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ReacStep – novel balance training programs to prevent falls in older adults

The ReacStep study is investigating the short-term effects of two balance training programs (i.e. reactive balance training and conventional balance training) on balance recovery from slips and trips in older adults. These programs are designed from evidence-based research and offer a challenging and unique experience to improving balance. The ReacStep team are calling on volunteers who: are aged 65 and over living independently in the Sydney metropolitan community can walk 500m comfortably with mobility aids or rest have not been advised by a medical practitioner not to exercise have no neurological conditions (e.g. Parkinson’s Disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, dementia, etc.) have no history or lower limb, pelvic or vertebral fracture(s) and/or lower limb joint replacement(s) in the past 6 months have no other existing conditions that may prevent them from exercising (e.g. injury, pain, fatigue, etc.) Eligible volunteers will be subjected to a health and safety screening before they are enrolled and randomly allocated into one of the two groups. Both groups will undertake a 3-week training program with an exercise physiologist, at NeuRA (i.e. in Randwick) as well as a balance recovery assessment at the 4-week time point. Reactive balance training involves intentionally stepping on a sliding tile, stepping over obstacles, trigger-release recovery as well as strength training. Participants will be wearing a full-body safety harness to ensure safety. Conventional balance training involves keeping balance in varying foot positions (i.e. feet together, in tandem or on one leg) whilst performing secondary tasks such as throwing a ball, card sorting, solving a maze or playing computer games. For more detailed information, read the Participant Information Statement and watch the video below. To get involved or to register your interest, click HERE. For all other queries, please contact the ReacStep Team on 02 9399 1002 or reacstep-study@neura.edu.au. HC210350 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym0zlwqhXmw
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