Research participant's arm in a machine designed for motor impairment study

Motor Impairment

RESEARCH CENTRE

Staff, students, visitors and colleagues

A number of staff at NeuRA are part of the core of the Program.
This includes:
Dr Annie BUTLER (a.butler@neura.edu.au)
Dr Martin HÉROUX (m.heroux@neura.edu.au)
Dr Phu HOANG (p.hoang@neura.edu.au)
Dr Jasmine MENANT (j.menant@neura.edu.au)
Dr Daina STURNIEKS (d.sturnieks@neura.edu.au)

A number of doctoral and other students are part of the Program.
This includes:
Joana CAETANO (j.caetano@neura.edu.au)
Siobhan FITZPATRICK (s.fitzpatrick@neura.edu.au)
David KENNEDY (d.kennedy@neura.edu.au)
James MCLAUGHLIN (james.mcloughlin@flinders.edu.au)
James NUZZO (j.nuzzo@neura.edu.au)
Daniel SCHOENE (d.schoene@neura.edu.au)
Trinidad VALENZUELA (t.valenzuela@neura.edu.au)

We are also being joined by a number of key visitors, collaborators and other contributors.
This includes:
Bart BOLSTERLEE, PhD student from the Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands (to April 2014)
Joanna DIONG, Lecturer, University of Sydney (January 2014 on)
Andreas EJUPI, PhD student from Austrian University of Technology, Austria (January to May 2014)
Graham KERR, Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia (January 2014 on)
Yves GSCHWIND, post-doctoral researcher from University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland (January to October 2014)
Hiske VAN DUINEN, post-doctoral researcher from the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden (January to March 2014)
Leah BENT, Associate Professor at the University of Guelph, Canada (February to June 2014)

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

The cold case of schizophrenia - broken wide open!

‘It is like they were miraculously healed!’’ Schizophrenia is diagnosed by clinical observation of behaviour and speech. This is why NeuRA researchers are working hard to understand the biological basis of the illness. Through hours of work and in collaboration with doctors and scientists here and around the world, NeuRA has made an amazing breakthrough. For the first time, researchers have discovered the presence of antibodies in the brains of people who lived with schizophrenia. Having found these antibodies, it has led NeuRA researchers to ask two questions. What are they doing there? What should we do about the antibodies– help or remove them? This is a key breakthrough. Imagine if we are treating schizophrenia all wrong! It is early days, but can you imagine the treatment implications if we’ve identified a new biological basis for the disease? It could completely change the way schizophrenia is managed, creating new treatments that will protect the brain. More than this, could we be on the verge of discovering a ‘curable’ form of schizophrenia? How you can help We are so grateful for your loyal support of schizophrenia research in Australia, and today I ask if you will consider a gift today. Or, to provide greater confidence, consider becoming a Discovery Partner by making a monthly commitment. We believe there is great potential to explore these findings. Will you help move today’s breakthrough into tomorrow’s cure? To read more about this breakthrough, click ‘read the full story’ below. You are also invited to read ‘Beth’s story’, whose sweet son Marcus lived with schizophrenia, by clicking here.
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