Transurban Road Safety Centre

RESEARCH CENTRE

Transurban Road Safety Centre was built in 2017 and is Australia’s first research-dedicated crash test lab. It combines world-class research with state-of-the-art facilities and equipment to provide a source of ongoing innovation in road safety.

The Centre

Our facility features a crash sled, capable of reaching speeds up to 64 km/h. It gives NeuRA’s researchers the opportunity to study a number of growing trends on Australian roads. These includes aged drivers and passenger’s safety, motorcyclist’s safety, motorcycle design, rear seat occupancy and restraint systems. The facility also enables our researchers to collect important data that reflects the severity of road crashes.

Our goals

NeuRA and Transurban have embarked on a second three year three-year partnership, which will continue to support the operations of NeuRA’s Transurban Road Safety Centre (TRSC) and the team of researchers who work there. Our goal is to alleviate the significant impact of death and injury on our roads through research.

Our findings

“NeuRA has made some exciting discoveries that will help keep Australia’s drivers, passengers and motorcyclists safer on our roads,” said the TRSC Lead Scientist, Professor Lynne Bilston. “Our research has included improving the use and effectiveness of child restraints, providing better advice to older drivers about how they can protect themselves while behind the wheel, and examining how motorcycles could be designed differently to reduce injury during a crash,” she said.

The TRSC’s findings are being provided to Australian regulatory bodies and motorist associations to inform the development of regulations and assist road users.

Our future

“Transurban is committed to strengthening communities through transport and safety is always our highest priority in delivering benefits to our customers and the community,” said Liz Waller, Road Safety Manager at Transurban.

Find out more

Older driver safety compromised by seat cushions and pillows

Researchers suggest a rethink of “banned” chest clips on child car restraints in Australia

Research finds that children are three times more likely to die or be seriously injured in a car crash if their car seat has been used incorrectly

Experts find that errors in child car seat use is putting children’s lives at risk

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Brain and Knee Muscle Weakness Study

Why Does Quadriceps Weakness Persist after Total Knee Replacement? An Exploration of Neurophysiological Mechanisms Total knee replacement is a commonly performed surgery for treating end-staged knee osteoarthritis. Although most people recover well after surgery, weakness of the quadriceps muscles (the front thigh muscles) persists long after the surgery (at least for 12 months), despite intensive physiotherapy and exercise. Quadriceps muscle weakness is known to be associated with more severe pain and greatly affect daily activities. This study aims to investigate the mechanisms underlying weakness of the quadriceps muscles in people with knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement. We hope to better understand the relationship between the changes of the brain and a loss of quadriceps muscle strength after total knee replacement. The study might be a good fit for you if you: Scheduled to undergo a total knee replacement; The surgery is scheduled within the next 4 weeks; Do not have a previous knee joint replacement in the same knee; Do not have high tibial osteotomy; Do not have neurological disorders, epilepsy, psychiatric conditions, other chronic pain conditions; Do not have metal implants in the skull; Do not have a loss of sensation in the limbs. If you decide to take part you would: Be contacted by the researcher to determine your eligibility for the study Be scheduled for testing if you are eligible and willing to take part in the study Sign the Consent Form when you attend the first testing session Attend 3 testing sessions (approximately 2 hours per session): 1) before total knee replacement, 2) 3 months and 3) 6 months after total knee replacement. The testing will include several non-invasive measures of brain representations of the quadriceps muscles, central pain mechanisms, and motor function and questionnaires. Will I be paid to take part in the research study? You will be reimbursed ($50.00 per session) for travel and parking expenses associated with the research study visits. If you would like more information or are interested in being part of the study, please contact: Name: Dr Wei-Ju Chang Email: w.chang@neura.edu.au Phone: 02 9399 1260 This research is being funded by the Physiotherapy Research Foundation.  
PROJECT