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Transurban Road Safety Centre

RESEARCH CENTRE

Transurban Road Safety Centre was built in 2017 and is Australia’s first research-dedicated crash test lab. It combines world-class research with state-of-the-art facilities and equipment to provide a source of ongoing innovation in road safety.

The Centre

Our facility features a crash sled, capable of reaching speeds up to 64 km/h. It gives NeuRA’s researchers the opportunity to study a number of growing trends on Australian roads. These includes aged drivers and passenger’s safety, motorcyclist’s safety, motorcycle design, rear seat occupancy and restraint systems. The facility also enables our researchers to collect important data that reflects the severity of road crashes.

Our goals

NeuRA and Transurban have recently announced a new three-year partnership, which will continue to support the operations of NeuRA’s Transurban Road Safety Centre (TRSC) and the team of researchers who work there. Our goal is to alleviate the significant impact of death and injury on our roads through research.

Our findings

“NeuRA has made some exciting discoveries that will help keep Australia’s drivers, passengers and motorcyclists safer on our roads,” said the TRSC Lead Scientist, Professor Lynne Bilston. “Our research has included improving the use and effectiveness of child restraints, providing better advice to older drivers about how they can protect themselves while behind the wheel, and examining how motorcycles could be designed differently to reduce injury during a crash,” she said.

The TRSC’s findings are being provided to Australian regulatory bodies and motorist associations to inform the development of regulations and assist road users.

Our future

“Transurban is committed to strengthening communities through transport and safety is always our highest priority in delivering benefits to our customers and the community,” said Liz Waller, Road Safety Manager at Transurban.

Find out more

Older driver safety compromised by seat cushions and pillows

Researchers suggest a rethink of “banned” chest clips on child car restraints in Australia

Research finds that children are three times more likely to die or be seriously injured in a car crash if their car seat has been used incorrectly

Experts find that errors in child car seat use is putting children’s lives at risk

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

What is the analgesic effect of EEG neurofeedback for people with chronic pain? A systematic review

Researchers: A/Prof Sylvia Gustin, Dr Negin Hesam-Shariati, Dr Wei-Ju Chang, A/Prof James McAuley, Dr Andrew Booth, A/Prof Toby Newton-John, Prof Chin-Teng Lin, A/Prof Zina Trost Chronic pain is a global health problem, affecting around one in five individuals in the general population. The understanding of the key role of functional brain alterations in the generation of chronic pain has led researchers to focus on pain treatments that target brain activity. Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback attempts to modulate the power of maladaptive EEG frequency powers to decrease chronic pain. Although several studies provide promising evidence, the effect of EEG neurofeedback on chronic pain is uncertain. This systematic review aims to synthesise the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the analgesic effect of EEG neurofeedback. The search strategy will be performed on five electronic databases (Cochrane Central, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, and CINAHL) for published studies and on clinical trial registries for completed unpublished studies. We will include studies that used EEG neurofeedback as an intervention for people with chronic pain. Risk of bias tools will be used to assess methodological quality of the included studies. RCTs will be included if they have compared EEG neurofeedback with any other intervention or placebo control. The data from RCTs will be aggregated to perform a meta-analysis for quantitative synthesis. In addition, non-randomised studies will be included for a narrative synthesis. The data from non-randomised studies will be extracted and summarised in a descriptive table. The primary outcome measure is pain intensity assessed by self-report scales. Secondary outcome measures include depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep quality measured by self-reported questionnaires. Further, we will investigate the non-randomised studies for additional outcomes addressing safety, feasibility, and resting-state EEG analysis.
PROJECT