Transurban Road Safety Centre

RESEARCH CENTRE

Transurban Road Safety Centre was built in 2017 and is Australia’s first research-dedicated crash test lab. It combines world-class research with state-of-the-art facilities and equipment to provide a source of ongoing innovation in road safety.

The Centre

Our facility features a crash sled, capable of reaching speeds up to 64 km/h. It gives NeuRA’s researchers the opportunity to study a number of growing trends on Australian roads. These includes aged drivers and passenger’s safety, motorcyclist’s safety, motorcycle design, rear seat occupancy and restraint systems. The facility also enables our researchers to collect important data that reflects the severity of road crashes.

Our goals

NeuRA and Transurban have embarked on a second three year three-year partnership, which will continue to support the operations of NeuRA’s Transurban Road Safety Centre (TRSC) and the team of researchers who work there. Our goal is to alleviate the significant impact of death and injury on our roads through research.

Our findings

“NeuRA has made some exciting discoveries that will help keep Australia’s drivers, passengers and motorcyclists safer on our roads,” said the TRSC Lead Scientist, Professor Lynne Bilston. “Our research has included improving the use and effectiveness of child restraints, providing better advice to older drivers about how they can protect themselves while behind the wheel, and examining how motorcycles could be designed differently to reduce injury during a crash,” she said.

The TRSC’s findings are being provided to Australian regulatory bodies and motorist associations to inform the development of regulations and assist road users.

Our future

“Transurban is committed to strengthening communities through transport and safety is always our highest priority in delivering benefits to our customers and the community,” said Liz Waller, Road Safety Manager at Transurban.

Find out more

Older driver safety compromised by seat cushions and pillows

Researchers suggest a rethink of “banned” chest clips on child car restraints in Australia

Research finds that children are three times more likely to die or be seriously injured in a car crash if their car seat has been used incorrectly

Experts find that errors in child car seat use is putting children’s lives at risk

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Abdominal muscle stimulation to improve bowel function in spinal cord injury

Bowel complications, resulting from impaired bowel function, are common for people living with a spinal cord injury (SCI). As a result, people with a SCI have high rates of bowel related illness, even compared with those with other neurological disorders. This includes high rates of abdominal pain, constipation, faecal incontinence and bloating. These problems lower the quality of life of people with a SCI and place a financial burden on the health system. A treatment that improves bowel function for people with a SCI should reduce illness, improve quality of life and lead to a large cost saving for health care providers. Bowel problems have traditionally been managed with manual and pharmacological interventions, such as digital rectal stimulation, enemas, and suppositories. These solutions are usually only partially effective, highlighting the need for improved interventions. The abdominal muscles are one of the major muscle groups used during defecation. Training the abdominal muscles should improve bowel function by increasing abdominal pressure. During our previous Abdominal FES research with people with a SCI, we observed that Abdominal FES appeared to lead to more consistent and effective bowel motion. However, this evidence remains anecdotal. As such, we are going to undertake a large randomised controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness of Abdominal FES to improve the bowel function of people with a SCI. This study will make use of a novel measurement system (SmartPill, Medtronic) that can be swallowed to measure whole gut and colonic transit time. We will also assess whether Abdominal FES can change constipation-related quality of life and the use of laxatives and manual procedures, as well as the frequency of defecation and the time taken. A positive outcome from this study is likely to lead to the rapid clinical translation of this technology for people living with a SCI.
PROJECT