NeuRA Imaging Centre

FACILITY INFORMATION

NeuRA has made a 3T MRI scanner available for research since 2003. The current scanner is a Philips 3T TX MRI (upgraded May 2010).

The facility currently operates for research 50% of the time and is open for research to scientists on a merit-based, user pays basis. It supports an active MRI research community of researchers from UNSW, The University of Sydney, Macquarie University and The University of Western Sydney as well as researchers from interstate and international sites as required.

LATEST NEWS AND EVENTS

Workshop on Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

A two day course on magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be held at Neuroscience Research Australia, on Tuesday 28th and Wednesday 29th of November 2017.

Troubleshooting those MRI button boxes

A two day course on magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be held at Neuroscience Research Australia, on Tuesday 28th and Wednesday 29th of November 2017.

Collect your MRI data via Hippocampus

A two day course on magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be held at Neuroscience Research Australia, on Tuesday 28th and Wednesday 29th of November 2017.

New MRI simulator computer

A two day course on magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be held at Neuroscience Research Australia, on Tuesday 28th and Wednesday 29th of November 2017.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
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PUBLICATIONS

Characterizing Sexual Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia.

Ahmed RM, Kaizik C, Irish M, Mioshi E, Dermody N, Kiernan MC, Piguet O, Hodges JR

We aimed to systematically quantify changes in sexual behavior, including current symptoms and changes from prior diagnoses, in behavioral-variant (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD), compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Overall loss of affection, reduced initiation of sexual activity, and responsiveness is an overwhelming feature of bvFTD. In contrast, aberrant or unusual sexual behavior is observed in the minority of bvFTD patients. The underlying pathophysiology of these changes likely reflects structural and functional changes in frontoinsular and limbic regions including the hypothalamus.

Eating behavior in frontotemporal dementia: Peripheral hormones vs hypothalamic pathology.

Ahmed RM, Latheef S, Bartley L, Irish M, Halliday GM, Kiernan MC, Hodges JR, Piguet O

To contrast the relationships of hormonal eating peptides and hypothalamic volumes to eating behavior and metabolic changes (body mass index [BMI]) in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). Eating abnormalities are multifactorial in FTD. In bvFTD, they are in part related to hypothalamic degeneration, with potential disintegration of the network connections between the hypothalamus and orbitofrontal cortex/reward pathways. In svPPA, although hypothalamic volumes are preserved, this group experiences elevated AgRP levels similar to bvFTD, which predicts BMI in both groups. This finding highlights the potential key role of AgRP in eating and metabolic changes and provides a potential target for treatment to modify disease progression.

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