NeuRA Imaging Centre

FACILITY INFORMATION

The NeuRA Imaging Centre houses a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. This scanner allows researchers to measure brain structure and function, as well as connectivities and chemistry in a non-invasive manner. In April 2007, the original Philips scanner was replaced with the latest model, the “Achieva”, having larger field gradients and a second radiofrequency channel. This enabled researchers to undertake a more extensive range of exciting new experiments, including 31P (brain bioenergetics) and 13C (brain metabolism) experiments, and to obtain higher angular resolution in their images.

During 2007, research using the scanner was expanded. A grant from the NSW Cancer Council allowed the Imaging Centre to purchase additional equipment to image smaller items. In addition, the facility joined the Australian National Imaging Facility, becoming part of a nationwide network that includes imaging facilities in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. From this National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) scheme, NeuRA Imaging was able to employ a Facilitation Fellow, Dr Michael Green, from 2008 to assist researchers who wish to access the facility under the National Imaging Facility.

Following a successful ARC Linkage Infrastructure and Equipment Fund (LIEF) application, the system was upgraded to Achieva TX in 2010. This system has multi-transmit technology as well as 32 receiver channels. A next generation 32 channel head coil was also purchased as part of this ARC grant. More than 90 projects are currently approved to use the facility.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

'I've got the best job for you dad. Your shaky arm will be perfect for it!'

Children… honest and insightful. Their innocence warms the heart. But what words do you use to explain to a child that daddy has an incurable brain disease? What words tell them that in time he may not be able to play football in the park, let alone feed himself? What words help them understand that in the later stages, dementia may also strike? Aged just 36, this was the reality that faced Steve Hartley. Parkinson's disease didn't care he was a fit, healthy, a young dad and devoted husband. It also didn't seem to care his family had no history of it. The key to defeating Parkinson's disease is early intervention, and thanks to a global research team, led by NeuRA, we're pleased to announce that early intervention may be possible. Your support, alongside national and international foundations Shake it Up Australia and the Michael J Fox Foundation, researchers have discovered that a special protein, found in people with a family history of the disease increases prior to Parkinson’s symptoms developing. This is an incredible step forward, because it means that drug therapies, aimed at blocking the increase in the protein, can be administered much earlier – even before symptoms strike. The next step is to understand when to give the drug therapies and which people will most benefit from it. But we need your help. A gift today will support vital research and in time help medical professionals around the world treat Parkinson’s disease sooner, with much better health outcomes. Thank you, in advance, for your support.  
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