NeuRA Imaging Centre

FACILITY INFORMATION

Access to MRI Scanner
If you have a new project that needs discussion, or you haven’t yet used the system, we suggest first contacting either the Senior Radiographer or Professor Caroline Rae in the first instance.

Apply for clearance for your project from the NeuRA Imaging Scientific Management Panel by downloading this form and submitting this to Bronwyn Chapman (b.chapman@neura.edu.au) for SMP review.

This process will generally only take one to two weeks as projects are reviewed as soon as practicable after receipt.

Scanning cannot proceed without appropriate research ethics clearances. See our ethics page for information.

Once you have SMP clearance and have agreed to our terms & conditions you may book scanning time by calling MRI reception on 93991200. If your scanning involves using the scanner under the National Imaging Facility, you may also apply to the NIF for subsidized access.

All users of the facility are required to attend the MRI Safety Induction Course before using the MRI scanner. Users must attend the course to enter the MRI control room.

 

Request for MRI Programming
In addition to the MRI Scanner, NeuRA Imaging now offers a programming service for researchers who have SMP approval. For a fee, fMRI projects needing stimulation Presentation programs can be structured and programmed subject to availability of the programmer. See Request for MRI programming form for more information.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

Caress the Detail: A Comprehensive MRI Atlas of the in Vivo Human Brain

This project aims to deliver the most comprehensive, detailed and stereotaxically accurate MRI atlas of the canonical human brain. In human neuroscience, researchers and clinicians almost always investigate images obtained from living individuals. Yet, there is no satisfactory MRI atlas of the human brain in vivo or post-mortem. There are some population-based atlases, which valiantly solve a number of problems, but they fail to address major needs. Most problematically, they segment only a small number of brain structures, typically about 50, and they are of limited value for the interpretation of a single subject/patient. In contrast to population-based approaches, the present project will investigate normal, living subjects in detail. We aim to define approximately 800 structures, as in the histological atlas of Mai, Majtanik and Paxinos (2016), and, thus, provide a “gold standard” for science and clinical practice. We will do this by obtaining high-resolution MRI at 3T and 7T of twelve subjects through a collaboration with Markus Barth from the Centre for Advanced Imaging at the University of Queensland (UQ). The limited number of subjects will allow us to image each for longer periods, obtaining higher resolution and contrast, and to invest the required time to produce unprecedented detail in segmentation. We will produce an electronic atlas for interpreting MR images, both as a tablet application and as an online web service. The tablet application will provide a convenient and powerful exegesis of brain anatomy for researchers and clinicians. The open access web service will additionally provide images, segmentation and anatomical templates to be used with most common MR-analysis packages (e.g., SPM, FSL, MINC, BrainVoyager). This will be hosted in collaboration with UQ, supporting and complementing their population-based atlas.
PROJECT