NeuRA Imaging Centre

FACILITY INFORMATION

Access to MRI Scanner
If you have a new project that needs discussion, or you haven’t yet used the system, we suggest first contacting either the Senior Radiographer or Professor Caroline Rae in the first instance.

Apply for clearance for your project from the NeuRA Imaging Scientific Management Panel by downloading this form and submitting this to Bronwyn Chapman (b.chapman@neura.edu.au) for SMP review.

This process will generally only take one to two weeks as projects are reviewed as soon as practicable after receipt.

Scanning cannot proceed without appropriate research ethics clearances. See our ethics page for information.

Once you have SMP clearance and have agreed to our terms & conditions you may book scanning time by calling MRI reception on 93991200. If your scanning involves using the scanner under the National Imaging Facility, you may also apply to the NIF for subsidized access.

All users of the facility are required to attend the MRI Safety Induction Course before using the MRI scanner. Users must attend the course to enter the MRI control room.

See what’s going on at NeuRA

FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

During three decades on Australian television, two simple words brought us to attention.

‘Hello daaaahling’. Outrageous, flamboyant, iconic – Jeanne Little captivated Australians everywhere with her unique style, cockatoo shrill voice and fashion sense. "Mum wasn't just the life of the party, she was the party.” Katie Little, Jeanne’s daughter remembers. This icon of Australian television brought a smile into Australian homes. Tragically, today Jeanne can't walk, talk or feed herself. She doesn't recognise anyone, with a random sound or laugh the only glimpse of who she truly is. Jeanne Little has Alzheimer's disease. The 1,000 Brains Study NeuRA is very excited to announce the 1,000 Brains Study, a ground-breaking research project to identify the elements in our brains that cause life-changing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other dementias. This study will focus on the key unresolved question: why do some of us develop devastating neurodegenerative diseases, while others retain good brain health? The study will compare the genomes of people who have reached old age with healthy brains against the genomes of those who have died from neurodegenerative diseases, with post mortem examination of brain tissue taking place at NeuRA’s Sydney Brain Bank. More information on the study can be found here. Will you please support dementia research and the 1,000 Brains Study and help drive the future of genetics research in Australia? https://youtu.be/q7fTZIisgAY
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