Dr Claire Shepherd in the Sydney Brain Bank labs

Sydney Brain Bank

FACILITY INFORMATION

ABOUT US

What is the Sydney Brain Bank?

The Sydney Brain Bank was established in 2009 and is located at NeuRA, one of Australia’s leading institutes in brain research.

Funded by NeuRA, the Sydney Brain Bank currently holds more than 700 brains.

Researchers conduct studies on these brains to gain a greater understanding of neurodegenerative conditions, which helps create better treatments.

The Sydney Brain Bank currently works with 10 brain donor programs.  These focus on conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, motor neuron disease, Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neurologically unaffected individuals.

On November 27, the National Rugby League (NRL) announced its support of the most recent donor program to the Sydney Brain Bank.  This research at NeuRA is looking into the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and impact of sports-related brain injuries.

 

How does the brain bank work?

Brain donors have detailed health assessments before their death in order to examine how neurodegenerative changes may or may not be impacting on their quality of life.

After death, a donor’s brain is divided into two halves, one side is frozen and the other is preserved in formalin.  This enables researchers to examine both cellular biochemical changes as well as any irregularities within the structure of the brain.

 

Why is this research so important?

Brain tissue from the Sydney Brain Bank is not only used by researchers at NeuRA, but is used by many researchers across Australia and throughout the world.  It is a vital resource for global research, with Sydney Brain Bank tissue facilitating over 300 studies since 2009.

Research into neurodegenerative diseases is impossible without the support of brain banks.  Only through post-mortem research can we identify the cellular changes occurring in the brains of those with neurological disorders.  Improved knowledge about diseases such as dementia or CTE could lead a better understanding of how they could be prevented.

 

How is the Sydney Brain Bank funded?

The Sydney Brain Bank is supported by NeuRA through philanthropic donations made to the NeuRA Foundation, and successfully awarded philanthropic and competitive grant funds.

 

How can you join a donor program?

Want to learn more about the Sydney Brain Bank and brain donation? Then please head to our Frequently Asked Questions page

 

The Sydney Brain Bank is based at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) which is located next to the Prince of Wales Hospital on Barker St in Randwick NSW.

Find us on Google maps
Download a Randwick Hospitals campus map (PDF)

   

 

SYDNEY BRAIN BANK TEAM

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FEEL THE BUZZ IN THE AIR? US TOO.

MyCOACH: Connected Advice for Cognitive Health

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and University of New South Wales (UNSW) are inviting people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD) to participate in a voluntary online research trial aiming to reduce the risk of dementia. What is the MyCOACH Trial about? This research aims to test the effectiveness of an e-learning and behaviour change course designed to support healthy brain ageing and reduce risk of dementia.  The course is tailored for people reporting cognitive difficulties or changes. The trial runs for 12 weeks, with a follow up at 1 and 2 years afterwards. What is involved in this research trial? Interested volunteers will be asked to complete some eligibility checks to confirm this study is a good match.    If you decide to take part you would: Be placed into either the MyCOACH e-learning group (“Intervention”) or the Control Education group (“Control”). To ensure the research is fair and unbiased, we cannot choose the group for you.   It will be random - like names out of a hat. MyCOACH e-learning group (“Intervention”):  Volunteers in this group participate in the 12 week online MyCOACH program.  This includes 6 e-learning chapters, as well as three phone consultations with a dietician and/or exercise physiologist, and a 3-month subscription to a brain training app. Control Education group (“Control”): Volunteers in this group will receive information about cognitive health and risk factors for dementia.  This group is important to be able to measure the effectiveness of the research.  At the end of the study, volunteers in this “control” group can access the full MyCOACH e-learning course. Take part in four telephone interviews throughout the study with questions about your health. This includes a follow-up at the end of 12 weeks, and 1 and 2 years later. You may be eligible to participate in the MyCOACH Trial if you: Have concerns about changes in your memory or thinking OR diagnosed with ‘Mild Cognitive Impairment’ Are 65 years of age or older   Expressions of interest [ninja_forms id=376]   Contact If you are interested or know someone who might be, please contact us for more information: Dinaz Parekh Email: mycoach@neura.edu.au Phone: (02) 9399 1815
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