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Aidan Cashin

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Doctoral Candidate

+61 2 9399 1806


Aidan Cashin is a Doctoral Candidate at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA). A member of the pain research group headed by Dr James McAuley, his research deals with investigating the mechanisms of treatments for chronic low back pain. He is also interested in increasing the openness and transparency of research and is involved in developing a reporting guideline for mechanisms evaluation studies.
Prior to commencing research, Aidan pursued a successful clinical career as an Accredited Exercise Physiologist, practising primarily in the field of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Aidan also has a casual academic position at the University of New South Wales, within the School of Medical Sciences and is involved in the teaching and evaluating of undergraduate exercise physiology students.

Projects Aidan Cashin is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

MEMOIR – a clinical trial for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a serious health condition, affecting approximately 20,000 people in Australia. It is characterised by severe burning, stinging and stabbing pain. People with CRPS are unable to use their painful limb and their ability to work or participate in normal social activities is severely restricted. Currently, there are no effective treatments for CRPS.

A vast body of research has demonstrated changes in brain processes in CRPS. The MEMOIR trial will investigate the effectiveness of two novel brain-directed treatments to reduce pain and improve function in people with CRPS.

MEMOIR consolidates the expertise of scientists and clinicians from NeuRA (A/Prof James McAuley, A/Prof Sylvia Gustin, Mr Michael Ferraro), the University of South Australia (Prof Lorimer Moseley), the University of Sydney (Prof Andrew McLachlan), the University of Notre Dame Australia Fremantle (Prof Benedict Wand, Prof Eric Visser), the University of Exeter (Prof Sallie Lamb), Brunel University London (Dr Neil O’Connell) and the University of Oxford (Dr Hopin Lee).

Due to the COVID-19 global pandemic, the commencement of MEMOIR has been delayed. Recruitment for MEMOIR will commence in September 2020.

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MEMOIR – a clinical trial for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

RESOLVE Trial for Chronic Low Back Pain

For people with long term back pain that is not getting better. We are testing two pain treatment programs that target the brain, for people with chronic low back pain.

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RESOLVE Trial for Chronic Low Back Pain

Medicines for Back Pain

Medicines are a common treatment for back pain. The aim of this program of research is to improve our understanding of the clinical effects of medicines. Several studies constitute this program. 
 
Studies: 
1. A scoping review of analgesic medicines for chronic low back pain
The objective of this study is to identify the available clinical trials of medicines for chronic low back pain.  
This information will contribute to the methodology of Study 3. 
 
2. Evaluation of the impact of unpublished data from clinical trial registries on the effects of medicines for low back pain. 
The objective of this study is to evaluate whether there is a difference between clinical trial data that are published and those that are not published. 
This information will contribute to the methodology of Study 3. 
 
3. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and opioid analgesics for chronic low back pain: a network meta-analysis. 
The objective of this study is to produce information about the clinical effects of available analgesic medicines for chronic low back pain. This information will be available in a Cochrane review to assist clinical prescription of medicines.
Related Publications: 
Bagg MK et al. (2018). Paracetamol, NSAIDS and opioid analgesics for chronic low back pain: a network meta-analysis [Protocol]. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 6.doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD013045

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Medicines for Back Pain

AGReMA – A Guideline for Reporting Mediation Analyses

There are a growing number of studies using mediation analysis to understand the mechanisms of health interventions and exposures. Recent work has shown that the reporting of these studies is heterogenous and incomplete. This problem stifles clinical application, reproducibility, and evidence synthesis. The development and implementation of A Guideline for Reporting Mediation Analyses (AGReMA) will improve the standardization, transparency, and completeness in the reporting of studies that use mediation analysis to understand the mechanisms of health interventions and exposures.

AGReMA Publications

Cashin AG, McAuley JH, Lamb SE, Hopewell S, Kamer SJ, Williams CM, Henschke N, Lee H. (2020). Development of A Guideline for Reporting Mediation Analyses (AGReMA). BMC Med Res Methodol 20(1):19. doi: 10.1186/s12874-020-0915-5. PMID: 32013883

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AGReMA – A Guideline for Reporting Mediation Analyses

EXERCISE FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: CASE STUDY – EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE AUSTRALIA (ESSA)

EXERCISE FOR CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN: A BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL APPROACH – THE NEURA BLOG

RESEARCH TEAM

THIAGO FOLLY Research Assistant

ANIKA HAIGH Research Assistant

PAULINE ZAHARA Research Assistant

IAN SKINNER Postdoctoral Fellow : 9399 1049
: i.skinner@neura.edu.au

ADRIAN TRAEGER PhD Candidate

DR HOPIN LEE PhD Candidate

Markus Hubscher

DR MARKUS HUEBSCHER Postdoctoral Fellow

PUBLICATIONS

Persistent Pain After Wrist or Hand Fracture: Development and Validation of a Prognostic Model.

Cashin AG, Traeger AC, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, di Pietro F, Parkitny L, McAuley JH

To develop and validate a prognostic model from a comprehensive range of candidate prognostic factors that can identify patients who are at risk of developing persistent pain following wrist or hand fracture. We developed and externally validated a prognostic model to predict persistent pain 4 months after a wrist or hand fracture. Future studies are needed to assess whether the accuracy of this model can be improved by updating and validating it in local settings.

Reproducible and replicable pain research: a critical review.

Lee H, Lamb SE, Bagg MK, Toomey E, Cashin AG, Moseley GL

Measuring two-point discrimination threshold with a caliper.

Cashin AG, McAuley JH
View all publications