Associate Professor Siobhan Schabrun

TEAM LEADER PROFILE

Senior Research Scientist and Group Leader, NeuRA Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW
R.D Wright Biomedical Fellow, NHMRC

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Associate Professor Siobhan Schabrun trained as a physiotherapist before completing a PhD in neuroscience at The University of Adelaide in 2009. Supported by a NHMRC Early Career Fellowship, she undertook post-doctoral training in pain neuroscience at The University of Queensland. In 2014, she received a Fulbright scholarship to further her interest in the neuroplasticity of pain in the USA and was awarded a QLD Young Tall Poppy Science Award. In 2018 she moved to NeuRA where she leads a program of research that seeks to understand why some people recover after an episode of musculoskeletal pain while others develop long-lasting, disabling pain.

Research interests include the discovery of biomarkers that can predict who will develop chronic pain – even before pain begins, investigation of the neurobiological mechanisms that underpin the transition from acute to chronic pain and the development and testing of non-invasive brain stimulation treatments for chronic pain. She is also passionate about improving the translation of research evidence into clinical practice.

Siobhan is deputy lead of the low back pain working group of the SPHERE musculoskeletal clinical academic group, a nominated member of the Global Young Academy and is one of the inaugural Superstars of STEM.

Projects Associate Professor Siobhan Schabrun is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

TRANSLATE: Improving the translation of research evidence into practice

Effective, safe and cost-efficient healthcare is achieved when treatment is evidence based. Yet, it takes 17 years on average for research evidence to be translated into clinical care. This results in the overuse of ineffective treatments – those that do more harm than good – and the underuse of effective treatments – those that can improve symptoms and promote faster recovery after illness of injury. As a result, there is a huge gap between the healthcare people should receive and the care they do receive. TRANSLATE seeks to reduce the evidence-clinical care gap by implementing and monitoring evidence-based models of care in private practice.

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TRANSLATE: Improving the translation of research evidence into practice

BRAIN-Boost: Non-invasive brain stimulation combined with exercise for knee OA

Osteoarthritis is a major global health problem with no cure. Exercise is the cornerstone of conservative treatment, but effects on pain and physical function are at best, moderate. Non-invasive brain stimulation has the potential to bolster the effects of exercise therapy, resulting in greater improvements in pain and function than can be achieved with exercise alone. Here we will investigate this possibility in a randomized controlled trial of people living with knee osteoarthritis.

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BRAIN-Boost: Non-invasive brain stimulation combined with exercise for knee OA

DISCOVER-pain: Discovery of a cortical biomarker signature for pain

Low back pain (LBP) is ranked as the top single cause of disability worldwide. Costs have risen faster than for any other health condition and LBP is now equal to ischemic heart disease, and second only to cancer, as the costliest health condition. Approximately 40% of people who experience acute LBP develop chronic pain. These individuals are unresponsive to treatment, experience high levels of pain, struggle to perform daily tasks and frequently develop psychosocial comorbidities. The enormous scale of the problem is matched only by the mystery that accompanies it: despite decades of research, why some people develop chronic LBP while others do not, remains unknown.

The identification of biomarkers that can predict who will develop chronic LBP is a holy grail of pain research. Our new research has uncovered evidence for a unique biomarker signature that appears to predict i) an individual’s susceptibility to high pain severity, even before pain begins and ii) an individual’s susceptibility to developing chronic LBP following an acute episode. These biomarkers are now undergoing detailed investigation in on-going studies.

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DISCOVER-pain: Discovery of a cortical biomarker signature for pain

UNmaPPed: Understanding the physiology of persistent pain

People in pain move differently. Yet, the biological basis for altered movement in pain is poorly understood. This lack of understanding has led to treatments for persistent pain that target generic symptoms with limited effect. This NHMRC-funded trial is the first to examine how different aspects of the nervous system are altered in pain and how this relates to movement. This information will guide the development of new treatment strategies for persistent pain in future.

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UNmaPPed: Understanding the physiology of persistent pain

UPWaRD: Understanding persistent pain where it resides – in the brain.

Persistent musculoskeletal pain is one of the most significant health issues in the developed world. Termed a ‘Western epidemic’, low back pain is the most common form of persistent musculoskeletal pain and a leading cause of suffering and disability. Despite the enormity of the problem, many current therapies target generic symptoms, not underlying mechanisms, with limited effect. In 2010, the Australian National Pain Summit concluded ‘the management of pain is shockingly inadequate’. This assessment is not surprising given that critical information on the biological changes that underpin persistent low back pain is lacking. The UPWaRD study is a 5-year NHMRC-funded trial that investigates the role of brain plasticity, along with biological changes in the spinal cord, hormonal changes, genetics and stress, in the development of persistent low back pain.

 

https://www.upwardbackpainstudy.com

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UPWaRD: Understanding persistent pain where it resides – in the brain.

CHANGING THE BRAIN PODCAST – ABC RADIO NATIONAL’S BIG IDEAS PROGRAM

MIND-BENDING DRUGS ANDDEVICES: CAN THEY MAKE US SMARTER?

CAN THE WAY WE MOVE LEAD TO CHRONIC PAIN?

IT’S ELECTRIFYING: NON-INVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION

HOW TEXTING TURNS YOU INTO A WALKING DISASTER