Dr Kim Delbaere

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Research Fellow and Group Leader, NeuRA Conjoint Senior Lecturer, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW
Research Fellow – Career Development Fellowship (Level 1), NHMRC

+612 9399 1066


Kim Delbaere is a Senior Research Scientist at NeuRA supported by the Australian NHMRC and a senior lecturer at UNSW, Sydney. She graduated in 2001 as a master in Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy at the Ghent University (Belgium) and completed her PhD in the area of falls in community-dwelling older people in 2005. In 2006, she moved to Australia to work at NeuRA on fear of falling in older people. She is a leading international researcher in the area of falls in older people. Her research has enhanced the understanding of interrelationships between falls and various physiological, psychological and cognitive factors. In 2011, she was awarded a prestigious NHMRC Achievement Award acknowledging her vision to find technological solutions for older adults to stay independent for longer through improved physical and mental health.

Projects Dr Kim Delbaere is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

Ageing and dementia in Aboriginal Australians

The project examines how to implement evidence based healthy brain ageing (dementia prevention) programs in urban and regional Aboriginal communities.

READ MORE

Ageing and dementia in Aboriginal Australians: promoting vitality, identifying decline and supporting communities

Understanding and preventing physical and cognitive decline and falls in older people with dementia

Falls and functional decline are common in people with dementia. Falls are more likely to result in injury, death and institutionalisation when compared to older people without dementia. There is limited evidence that falls can be prevented in people with dementia. Strategies aimed at maintaining independence and preventing decline and falls are urgently needed. This research will a) further our understanding of fall risk and functional decline and b) explore novel fall and decline prevention programs, including the use of technology in older people with dementia.

READ MORE

Understanding and preventing physical and cognitive decline and falls in older people with dementia

Interrelationships between physical, cognitive and psychological function and falls

The overall research objective of our ongoing research in this area is to develop a clearer understanding of inter-related underlying mechanisms of the effects across the triad of physical, psychological, cognitive and neural impairments on falls and healthy ageing.

READ MORE

Interrelationships between physical, cognitive and psychological function and falls

Falls, ageing and dementia in Indigenous Australians

We aim to identify determinants for the high prevalence of dementia in Indigenous Australians, and will now extend these findings by exploring determinants for the high prevalence of falls.

READ MORE

Falls, ageing and dementia in Indigenous Australians

Innovative approaches to prevent falls in older people

Physical exercise training has been the primary focus of single interventions trials to reduce falls and advance healthy ageing. However, high attrition rates suggest that current approaches are not sufficient to guarantee long-term adherence to exercise in the majority of older adults.

READ MORE

Innovative approaches to prevent falls in older people

Novel methods for fall prediction in older people

Technological advances have enabled less expensive ways to quantify physical fall risk in the homes of older people.

READ MORE

Novel methods for fall prediction in older people

RESEARCH TEAM

Kylie Radford

DR KYLIE RADFORD Postdoctoral Fellow

Ashley Woodbury

ASHLEY WOODBURY Research Assistant

Linda Pickett

LINDA PICKETT Research Assistant

Trinidad Valenzuela

TRINIDAD VALENZUELA PhD student

Lillian Miles

LILLIAN MILES Research Assistant

Ashton  May

ASHTON MAY Research Assistant

Mitchell Browne

MITCHELL BROWNE Research Assistant

Dex Go

DEXTER GO Research Assistant

Jaime Garcia

JAIME GARCIA Research Assistant

Kenneth Chew

KENNETH CHEW ILP student

Maike Visschedijk

MAIKE VISSCHEDIJK Visiting student

PUBLICATIONS

Use of a physiological profile to document motor impairment in ageing and in clinical groups.

Lord SR, Delbaere K, Gandevia SC

Comparison of Three Cognitive Screening Tools in Older Urban and Regional Aboriginal Australians.

Radford K, Mack HA, Draper B, Chalkley S, Delbaere K, Daylight G, Cumming RG, Bennett H, Broe GA

The MMSE is an effective cognitive screening tool in urban Aboriginal populations. The mKICA is a good alternative when illiteracy, language or cultural considerations deem it appropriate. The RUDAS also has adequate validity in this population.

Prevalence of dementia in urban and regional Aboriginal Australians.

Radford K, Mack HA, Draper B, Chalkley S, Daylight G, Cumming R, Bennett H, Delbaere K, Broe GA

Consistent with previous findings in a remote population, urban and regional Aboriginal Australians face high rates of dementia at younger ages, most commonly Alzheimer's dementia.

View all publications