Dr Lucette Cysique

TEAM LEADER PROFILE

NHMRC Research Fellow, NeuRA Senior Lecturer, UNSW
Affiliate, St Vincent’s Hospital Applied Medical Research Centre

+612 9399 1880


Dr Cysique’s cursus includes a PhD (09/2005, UNSW) in the neuropsychology of HIV infection, a 3-year post-doctoral fellowship at the prestigious HIV Neurobehavioral Research Centre (University of California San Diego, UCSD) where she was trained in the neuropsychology of HIV and Hep C. While at UCSD, Dr Cysique also received training in MRI of HIV and HCV at the Laboratory of Cognitive Imaging. Upon her return to Australia in 2008, she was awarded a three-year Brain Sciences UNSW fellowship, and subsequently a three-year NHMRC project grant and, several industries’ support grants. In 2009, Dr Cysique became a visiting research officer at Neuroscience Research Australia in the Brain Structure and Functions Theme where she received training in MR Spectroscopy and diffusion imaging. In 2013, Dr Cysique was awarded a four-year NHMRC Clinical Career Development Fellowship to pursue her independent research career into the chronic effects of HIV on brain functions. In June 2013, Dr Cysique was promoted to Senior Lecturer at UNSW Medicine. She is chief investigator on one multi-center international trial (Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment- START), one multi-sites overseas study in Canada (Brain Health Now in HIV), and seven national studies/trials and leader of the HIV and Brain Ageing studies at NeuRA/UNSW. Dr Cysique has started to develop an angle of research into effects of alcohol on brain functions in teenagers in collaboration with Prof Caroline Rae, the study investigates the integrity of the white matter structure in teenagers who binge versus those who are alcohol abstainers. Dr Cysique’s research also investigates other conditions and factors that are relevant to the global HIV epidemic such as the development of cross-culturally valid tools and methods to assess cognitive function, mental health and the effects of alcohol on the brain.

Projects Dr Lucette Cysique is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

Cross-culturally valid assessment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

This project aims to develop a screening and standard neuropsychological battery that is cross-culturally valid for assessment of neurocognitive functions in HIV infection, in culturally and linguistically diverse Australians

READ MORE

Cross-culturally valid assessment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

Cross-disciplinary assessment of chronic HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

This study focuses on HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder mechanisms in chronic and virally suppressed HIV infection as well as in patients who are aging and are at higer risks of cardiovascular diseases.

READ MORE

Cross-disciplinary assessment of chronic HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

CNS reservoirs in NeuroHIV

This project is dedicated to the identification and quantification of HIV reservoirs biomarkers in the Central Nervous System.

READ MORE

CNS reservoirs in NeuroHIV

Strategic timing of antiretroviral treatment neurology sub-study

The aim of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) Neurology trial, is to investigate whether immediate initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) is superior to deferral of ART until the CD4+ declines below 350 cells/mm3 on neuropsychological functions.

READ MORE

Strategic timing of antiretroviral treatment neurology sub-study

Brain health now for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

This study is focused on how to determine the prevalence and incidence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in Canada and to assess cognitive rehabilitation/training strategies.

READ MORE

Brain health now for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

Binge drinking and the adolescent brain

This study is examining effects of binge alcohol consumption in 16-17 year olds using questionnaires, magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive testing. It aims to determine whether binge consumption of alcohol is impacting adolescent brain and cognitive development.

READ MORE

Binge drinking and the adolescent brain

UNSW RESEARCHER PROFILE

GOOGLE SCHOLAR PROFILE

ORCID PROFILE

RESEARCH TEAM

DR RACHAEL CHERIE CVEJIC Research Associate : r.cvejic@neura.edu.au

GEMMA HOWDLE Research Assistant : g.howdle@neura.edu.au

Kimberley Bassett

KIMBERLEY BASSETT Masters student : kimberley.bassett68@gmail.com

NICOLA EARLS Masters Student : nicole.earls@students.mq.edu.au

JOSHUA HOOD Research Associate : joshua.hood@students.mq.edu.au

THOMAS GATES Research Associate : thomas.gates@svha.org.au

DAVID JAKABEK Research Associate, Conjoint Associate Lecturer, St. Vincent’s Hospital Clinical School UNSW Medicine : d.jakabek@unsw.edu.au

PUBLICATIONS

Atrophic brain signatures of mild forms of neurocognitive impairment in virally suppressed HIV infection.

Nichols MJ, Gates TM, Soares JR, Moffat KJ, Rae CD, Brew BJ, Cysique LA

There is a lack of evidence for the neurobiological underpinning of Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment (ANI) and Mild Neurocognitive disorders (MND) in virally-suppressed HIV + persons. We hypothesized that such mild impairment would be associated with focal brain atrophy. ANI shows specific frontal WM atrophy to which HIV disease duration is a unique contributor. MND is characterised by more widespread subcortical atrophy.

Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection With and Without Comorbidities Appears to Converge Toward Early Pathological Brain Aging.

Cysique LA

No neurocognitive advantage for immediate antiretroviral treatment in adults with greater than 500 CD4+ T-cell counts.

Wright EJ, Grund B, Robertson KR, Cysique L, Brew BJ, Collins GL, Poehlman-Roediger M, Vjecha MJ, Penalva de Oliveira AC, Standridge B, Carey C, Avihingsanon A, Florence E, Lundgren JD, Arenas-Pinto A, Mueller NJ, Winston A, Nsubuga MS, Lal L, Price RW,

To compare the effect of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral treatment (ART) on neuropsychological test performance in treatment-naive HIV-positive adults with more than 500 CD4 cells/μl. We observed substantial improvement in neurocognitive test performance during the first year in both study arms, underlining the importance of using a control group in studies assessing neurocognitive performance over time. Immediate ART neither benefitted nor harmed neurocognitive performance in individuals with CD4 cell counts above 500 cells/μl.

View all publications