Liz Bye

PUBLICATIONS

Strength training for partially paralysed muscles in people with recent spinal cord injury: a within-participant randomised controlled trial.

Bye EA, Harvey LA, Gambhir A, Kataria C, Glinsky JV, Bowden JL, Malik N, Tranter KE, Lam CP, White JS, Gollan EJ, Arora M, Gandevia SC

To determine whether strength training combined with usual care increases strength in partially paralysed muscles of people with recent spinal cord injury (SCI) more than usual care alone. Strength training increases strength in partially paralysed muscles of people with recent SCI, although it is not clear whether the size of the treatment effect is clinically meaningful. Strength training has no deleterious effects on spasticity.

A preliminary investigation of mechanisms by which short-term resistance training increases strength of partially paralysed muscles in people with spinal cord injury.

Bye EA, Harvey LA, Glinsky JV, Bolsterlee B, Herbert RD

To investigate mechanisms by which short-term resistance training (6 weeks) increases strength of partially paralysed muscles in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). This study is the first to examine the mechanisms by which voluntary strength training increases strength of partially paralysed muscles in people with SCI. The data suggest that strength gains produced by six weeks of strength training are not caused by changes in muscle architecture. This suggests short-term strength gains are due to increased neural drive or an increase in specific muscle tension.

The inter-rater reliability of the 13-point manual muscle test in people with spinal cord injury.

Bye E, Glinsky J, Yeomans J, Hungerford A, Patterson H, Chen L, Harvey L

MRI-based Measurement of Effects of Strength Training on Intramuscular Fat in People with and without Spinal Cord Injury.

Bolsterlee B, Bye EA, Eguchi J, Thom J, Herbert RD

On the basis of these findings, we recommend the use of mDixon methods in preference to T1-weighted methods to determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing intramuscular fat.

Abdominal functional electrical stimulation to assist ventilator weaning in critical illness: a double-blinded, randomised, sham-controlled pilot study.

McCaughey EJ, Jonkman AH, Boswell-Ruys CL, McBain RA, Bye EA, Hudson AL, Collins DW, Heunks LMA, McLachlan AJ, Gandevia SC, Butler JE

Our compliance rates demonstrate the feasibility of using abdominal FES with critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. While abdominal FES did not lead to differences in abdominal muscle or diaphragm thickness, it may be an effective method to reduce ventilation duration and ICU length of stay in this patient group. A fully powered study into this effect is warranted.