Matthew K Bagg

PUBLICATIONS

Clarification of Reporting of Outcome Measures and Protocol Deviations in Report of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

Skinner IW, Cashin AG, Bagg MK

Reproducible and replicable pain research: a critical review.

Lee H, Lamb SE, Bagg MK, Toomey E, Cashin AG, Moseley GL

Correspondence: Living systematic reviews.

Bagg MK, McAuley JH

Comparing interventions with network meta-analysis.

Bagg MK, Salanti G, McAuley JH

Better than what? Comparisons in low back pain clinical trials.

Travers MJ, Bagg MK, Gibson W, O'Sullivan K, Palsson TS

Recent data from radiofrequency denervation trials further emphasise that treating nociception is not the same as treating pain.

Bagg MK, McAuley JH, Moseley GL, Wand BM

Comment: A Comparison of the Efficacy and Tolerability of the Treatments for Sciatica: A Network Meta-Analysis.

Bagg MK, McAuley JH

The RESOLVE Trial for people with chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised clinical trial.

Bagg MK, Hübscher M, Rabey M, Wand BM, O'Hagan E, Moseley GL, Stanton TR, Maher CG, Goodall S, Saing S, O'Connell NE, Luomajoki H, McAuley JH

Should this systematic review and meta-analysis change my practice? Part 2: exploring the role of the comparator, diversity, risk of bias and confidence.

Travers MJ, Murphy MC, Debenham JR, Chivers P, Bulsara MK, Bagg MK, Palsson TS, Gibson W

Reviews may overestimate the effectiveness of medicines for back pain: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Bagg MK, O'Hagan E, Zahara P, Wand BM, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, McAuley JH

Systematic-reviews of analgesics for low back pain generally include published data only. Obtaining data from unpublished trials is potentially important because they may impact effect sizes in meta-analyses. We determined whether including unpublished data from trial registries changes the effect sizes in meta-analyses of analgesics for low back pain. Systematic-reviews should include reports of unpublished trials. The result for muscle relaxants conflicts with the conclusion of the published review and recent international guidelines. Adding unpublished data strengthens the evidence that opioid analgesics have small effects on persistent low back pain and more clearly suggests these effects may not be clinically meaningful.

Author Response to Cibulka.

Palsson TS, Gibson W, Darlow B, Bunzli S, Lehman G, Rabey M, Moloney N, Vaegter HB, Bagg MK, Travers M

Letter in response to: 'Which specific modes of exercise training are most effective for treating low back pain? Network meta-analysis' by Owen .

Maher CG, Hayden JA, Saragiotto BT, Yamato TP, Bagg MK

Changing the Narrative in Diagnosis and Management of Pain in the Sacroiliac Joint Area.

Palsson TS, Gibson W, Darlow B, Bunzli S, Lehman G, Rabey M, Moloney N, Vaegter HB, Bagg MK, Travers M

Should this systematic review and meta-analysis change my practice? Part 1: exploring treatment effect and trustworthiness.

Travers MJ, Murphy MC, Debenham JR, Chivers P, Bulsara MK, Bagg MK, Palsson TS, Gibson W

Comparative Effectiveness of Treatments for Chronic Low Back Pain.

Bagg MK, McAuley JH

Limited engagement with transparent and open science standards in the policies of pain journals: a cross-sectional evaluation.

Cashin AG, Bagg MK, Richards GC, Toomey E, McAuley JH, Lee H

A systematic review highlights the need to improve the quality and applicability of trials of physical therapy interventions for low back pain.

Cashin AG, Lee H, Bagg MK, O'Hagan E, Traeger AC, Kamper SJ, Folly T, Jones MD, Booth J, McAuley JH

To review and assess the methodological quality of randomised controlled trials that test physical therapy interventions for low back pain. The majority of trials that test physical therapy interventions for low back pain have methodological limitations that could bias treatment effect estimates. Greater attention to simple methodological features, such as allocation concealment and the reporting of intention-to-treat effects, would improve the quality of trials testing physical therapy interventions for low back pain.