Our response to COVID-19

We're supporting people to maintain their wellbeing and manage isolation.

Patrick Skippen

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Postdoctoral Fellow

02 9399 1864


Patrick is a cognitive neuroscientist, with a background in cognitive modelling and brain imaging (namely electroencephalography; EEG). In his current role, he is applying these skills to investigate how measures of brain activity can describe the cause and consequence of cognitive deficits seen in patients suffering with chronic pain. As part of a larger team, Patrick is currently working to validate a novel cortical biomarker signature for pain using EEG. You can connect and follow Patrick’s work below and on Twitter.

Patrick has built a strong skill set in programming and analysis of behaviour and brain activity during his career. During his PhD, Patrick used complex Bayesian models to explore the underlying processes that make up impulse control in adolescents and young adults. Code and analysis scripts of his completed projects can be found here.

Projects Patrick Skippen is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

MODULATE: Altering the brains sensitivity to pain

Pain is the single most common reason for seeking medical attention. Under normal circumstances, pain acts to signal injury and is a protective response that prevents further damage and promotes tissue healing. People differ not only in their ability to detect and tolerate pain, but also in their ability to recover from an injury, with some people experiencing pain that outlasts the duration of tissue healing. Interventions to treat or cure chronic pain have had limited success.

Recent research has identified a novel cortical biomarker that could identify individuals at risk of developing chronic pain, which could be used to identify individuals at high risk of transitioning from acute to chronic pain (PREDICT project). However, whether a causal relationship exists between this cortical biomarker and pain is unknown.

The pain biomarker is based on rhythmic patterns of electrical activity in the brain and is measured using electroencephalography (EEG). Previous research suggests that the speed of this rhythmic activity can be altered through the administration of nicotine. MODULATE will attempt to alter the speed of the brain’s rhythmic activity, using nicotine gum, and observe the impact on pain. The project will help determine whether a causal relationship exists between the biomarker and pain.

 

READ MORE

MODULATE: Altering the brains sensitivity to pain

UPWaRD: Understanding persistent pain where it resides – in the brain.

Persistent musculoskeletal pain is one of the most significant health issues in the developed world. Termed a ‘Western epidemic’, low back pain is the most common form of persistent musculoskeletal pain and a leading cause of suffering and disability. Despite the enormity of the problem, many current therapies target generic symptoms, not underlying mechanisms, with limited effect. In 2010, the Australian National Pain Summit concluded ‘the management of pain is shockingly inadequate’. This assessment is not surprising given that critical information on the biological changes that underpin persistent low back pain is lacking. The UPWaRD study is a 5-year NHMRC-funded trial that investigates the role of brain plasticity, along with biological changes in the spinal cord, hormonal changes, genetics and stress, in the development of persistent low back pain.

 

https://www.upwardbackpainstudy.com

READ MORE

UPWaRD: Understanding persistent pain where it resides – in the brain.

PREDICT: A novel cortical biomarker signature for predicting pain sensitivity

Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is the second most common musculoskeletal pain condition and is associated with pain and tenderness of the jaw. Although a number of biological factors have shown an association with chronic TMD in cross-sectional and case control studies, there are currently no biomarkers that can predict the development of chronic symptoms. Because of the difficulty in treating chronic pain, development of brain signal predictive biomarkers is of growing interest.

The PREDICT project will aim to develop a predictive biomarker signature of pain severity and duration using two commonly available techniques – electroencephalogram (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) – and perform initial clinical validation in first onset TMD. The biomarker could have utility in identifying patients at high risk of transitioning from acute to chronic pain and has additional potential for clinical application in the treatment and prevention of chronic pain.

This project will be carried out in collaboration with a team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore lead by A/Prof David Seminowicz (see more information here).

PREDICT Publications

Seminowicz DA, Bilska K, Chowdhury NS, Skippen P, Millard SK, Chiang A, Chen S, Furman AJ, & Schabrun SM. (2020). A novel cortical biomarker signature for predicting pain sensitivity: protocol for the PREDICT longitudinal analytical validation study. Pain Reports, 5(4), e833. doi: 10.1097/PR9.0000000000000833

READ MORE

PREDICT: A novel cortical biomarker signature for predicting pain sensitivity

RESEARCH TEAM

PUBLICATIONS

A novel cortical biomarker signature for predicting pain sensitivity: protocol for the PREDICT longitudinal analytical validation study.

Seminowicz DA, Bilska K, Chowdhury NS, Skippen P, Millard SK, Chiang AKI, Chen S, Furman AJ, Schabrun SM

Reliability of triggering inhibitory process is a better predictor of impulsivity than SSRT.

Skippen P, Matzke D, Heathcote A, Fulham WR, Michie P, Karayanidis F

Does cognitive control ability mediate the relationship between reward-related mechanisms, impulsivity, and maladaptive outcomes in adolescence and young adulthood?

McKewen M, Skippen P, Cooper PS, Wong ASW, Michie PT, Lenroot R, Karayanidis F
View all publications