Rebecca Alexander

RESEARCHER PROFILE

PhD Student

+61 02 6125 2384


Rebecca is a PhD (Clinical Psychology) candidate at the Australian National University (ANU). Her research investigates the neuroscience of resilience and is supervised by Dr Justine Gatt at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) / University of New South Wales (UNSW). Rebecca also works as a Research Assistant and has co-authored and published papers in diverse fields spanning health psychology, public health, clinical psychology and teaching and learning best practice. As a graduate of the University of Canberra, Rebecca achieved First Class Honours in Psychology investigating the impact of language on emotion perception and was the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Academic Achievement.

Projects Rebecca Alexander is currently involved with

CURRENT PROJECTS

The role of reward in the neurogenetics of resilience

Identifying the precise role of reward in the resilience process; in particular the role of reward sensitivity and different paradigms of measurement in young adults.

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The role of reward in the neurogenetics of resilience

RESEARCH TEAM

PUBLICATIONS

Systematic review of aged care interventions for older prisoners.

Stevens BA, Shaw R, Bewert P, Salt M, Alexander R, Loo Gee B

The care of older prisoners is a growing problem. This review examined aged care interventions in prisons. This review found no significant interventions in prisons. However, the qualitative findings showed evidence of best practice.

Well-being in wounds inventory (WOWI): development of a valid and reliable measure of well-being in patients with wounds.

Upton D, Upton P, Alexander R

Physical and psychosocial deficits have been reported in people living with chronic wounds. While the negative impact of these factors on an individual's quality of life (QoL) is well documented, there has been little research into the well-being of those living with chronic wounds, despite recent calls for increased attention to this related, yet distinct construct. This paper introduces the Well-being in Wounds Inventory (WOWI) and provides support for the WOWI as a valid and reliable measure of well-being in patients living with chronic wounds. The current study highlights the importance of assessing well-being factors in individuals living with chronic wounds. It introduces the WOWI as a valid and reliable measure of well-being in chronic wound patients. The authors recommend health-care practitioners take account of well-being as part of a holistic treatment plan in order to maximise patient outcomes.

Contribution of the Leg Club model of care to the well-being of people living with chronic wounds.

Upton D, Upton P, Alexander R

Social support impacts well-being. Higher levels of social support encourage treatment adherence and aid healing in people living with chronic wounds. The Leg Club model of care harnesses social support mechanisms to improve patient outcomes. This study investigated whether social support mechanisms available through a Leg Club environment influenced well-being. Attending a Leg Club enhances well-being in people living with a chronic wound; social support has an important role to play in this relationship. Future research should consider the specific interplay of social support mechanisms of Leg Club, and other relevant wound-related variables to optimise patient well-being and treatment outcomes.

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