Stefanie Mikolaizak

PUBLICATIONS

Comparison of Standard Clinical and Instrumented Physical Performance Tests in Discriminating Functional Status of High-Functioning People Aged 61⁻70 Years Old.

Coni A, Ancum JMV, Bergquist R, Mikolaizak AS, Mellone S, Chiari L, Maier AB, Pijnappels M

Inaccurate judgement of reach is associated with slow reaction time, poor balance, impaired executive function and predicts prospective falls in older people with cognitive impairment.

Taylor ME, Butler AA, Lord SR, Delbaere K, Kurrle SE, Mikolaizak AS, Close JCT

Inaccurate reach judgement predicts future falls and is associated with poorer global cognitive performance and executive function, increased concern about falling, slower reaction time and poorer balance. Our results offer insight into the disparity between actual and perceived physical capabilities in people with CI, and how this impacts their risk of falling.

Concurrent validity and reliability of the Community Balance and Mobility scale in young-older adults.

Weber M, Van Ancum J, Bergquist R, Taraldsen K, Gordt K, Mikolaizak AS, Nerz C, Pijnappels M, Jonkman NH, Maier AB, Helbostad JL, Vereijken B, Becker C, Schwenk M

Concurrent validity of the CBM was good when compared to the FAB and moderate to good when compared to other measures of balance and mobility. Based on this study, the CBM can be recommended to measure balance and mobility performance in the specific population of young-older adults.

Prospective analysis of time out-of-home and objectively measured walking duration during a week in a large cohort of older adults.

Rapp K, Mikolaizak S, Rothenbacher D, Denkinger MD, Klenk J

Being out-of-home increases daily walking duration. The association is strongest if the time out-of-home is 100 min or less.

Complexity of Daily Physical Activity Is More Sensitive Than Conventional Metrics to Assess Functional Change in Younger Older Adults.

Zhang W, Schwenk M, Mellone S, Paraschiv-Ionescu A, Vereijken B, Pijnappels M, Mikolaizak AS, Boulton E, Jonkman NH, Maier AB, Klenk J, Helbostad J, Taraldsen K, Aminian K

German version of the Community Balance and Mobility Scale : Translation and evaluation of measurement properties.

Gordt K, Mikolaizak AS, Nerz C, Barz C, Gerhardy T, Weber M, Becker C, Schwenk M

The aim was 1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt the CBM into the German language and 2) to investigate the measurement properties of the German CBM (G-CBM). The G‑CBM is a valid and reliable tool for measuring subtle balance deficits in older high-functioning adults. The absence of ceiling effects emphasizes the use of this scale in this cohort. The G‑CBM can now be utilized in clinical practice.

Adherence to a multifactorial fall prevention program following paramedic care: Predictors and impact on falls and health service use. Results from an RCT a priori subgroup analysis.

Mikolaizak AS, Lord SR, Tiedemann A, Simpson P, Caplan G, Bendall JC, Howard K, Close J

To identify predictors and impact of adherence to a multifactorial fall-prevention program on falls and health service utilisation. Older adults who adhere to recommendations benefit, regardless of fall-risk profile.

Slow gait speed is associated with executive function decline in older people with mild to moderate dementia: A one year longitudinal study.

Taylor ME, Lasschuit DA, Lord SR, Delbaere K, Kurrle SE, Mikolaizak AS, Kvelde T, Close JCT

This study aimed to document change in neuropsychological, physical and functional performance over one year and to investigate the relationship between baseline gait speed and cognitive decline in this period in older people with dementia. Older people with mild to moderate dementia demonstrate significant decline in neuropsychological, physical and functional performance over one year. Baseline gait speed is associated with decline in executive function over one year, suggesting shared pathways/pathology between gait and cognition.

A multidisciplinary intervention to prevent subsequent falls and health service use following fall-related paramedic care: a randomised controlled trial.

Mikolaizak AS, Lord SR, Tiedemann A, Simpson P, Caplan GA, Bendall J, Howard K, Webster L, Payne N, Hamilton S, Lo J, Ramsay E, O'Rourke S, Roylance L, Close JC

to evaluate the impact of a fall-risk assessment and tailored fall prevention interventions among older community-dwellers not transported to ED following a fall on subsequent falls and health service use. a multidisciplinary intervention did not prevent falls in older people who received paramedic care but were not transported to ED. However the intervention was effective in those who adhered to the recommendations.

Reaction Time and Postural Sway Modify the Effect of Executive Function on Risk of Falls in Older People with Mild to Moderate Cognitive Impairment.

Taylor ME, Lord SR, Delbaere K, Kurrle SE, Mikolaizak AS, Close JCT

To explore the relationship between cognitive performance and falls in older people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment (CI) by investigating the mediational effects of medical, medication, neuropsychological, and physiological factors. Within this sample of older people with mild to moderate CI, poorer EF increased the risk of multiple falls. This relationship was mediated by reaction time and postural sway,suggesting cognitively impaired older people with poorer EF may benefit from fall prevention programs targeting these mediating factors.

Systemic VEGF-A neutralization ameliorates diet-induced metabolic dysfunction.

Wu LE, Meoli CC, Mangiafico SP, Fazakerley DJ, Cogger VC, Mohamad M, Pant H, Kang MJ, Powter E, Burchfield JG, Xirouchaki CE, Mikolaizak AS, Stöckli J, Kolumam G, van Bruggen N, Gamble JR, Le Couteur DG, Cooney GJ, Andrikopoulos S, James DE

Neuropsychological, physical, and functional mobility measures associated with falls in cognitively impaired older adults.

Taylor ME, Delbaere K, Lord SR, Mikolaizak AS, Brodaty H, Close JC

This study identified several risk factors of falls in older people with cognitive impairment, a number of which are potentially modifiable. Future research involving targeted interventions addressing medication use, balance, mood, and functional performance may prove useful for fall prevention in this population.

Systematic review of non-transportation rates and outcomes for older people who have fallen after ambulance service call-out.

Mikolaizak AS, Simpson PM, Tiedemann A, Lord SR, Close JC

Limited but promising evidence shows that appropriate interventions can improve health outcomes of non-transported older people who have fallen. Further studies are needed to explore alternate care pathways and promote more efficient use of health services.

Older fallers attended to by an ambulance but not transported to hospital: a vulnerable population at high risk of future falls.

Tiedemann A, Mikolaizak AS, Sherrington C, Segin K, Lord SR, Close JC

This prospective cohort study describes older non-transported fallers seen by the Ambulance Service of New South Wales (ASNSW), quantifies the level of risk and identifies predictors of future falls and ambulance use. Older, non-transported fallers seen by the ASNSW are a vulnerable population with high rates of chronic health conditions.

Discriminative ability and predictive validity of the timed up and go test in identifying older people who fall: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Schoene D, Wu SM, Mikolaizak AS, Menant JC, Smith ST, Delbaere K, Lord SR

To investigate the discriminative ability and diagnostic accuracy of the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) as a clinical screening instrument for identifying older people at risk of falling. The findings suggest that the TUG is not useful for discriminating fallers from non-fallers in healthy, high-functioning older people but is of more value in less-healthy, lower-functioning older people. Overall, the predictive ability and diagnostic accuracy of the TUG are at best moderate. No cut-point can be recommended. Quick, multifactorial fall risk screens should be considered to provide additional information for identifying older people at risk of falls.

Physiological fall risk factors in cognitively impaired older people: a one-year prospective study.

Taylor ME, Lord SR, Delbaere K, Mikolaizak AS, Close JC

These findings indicate poor performance on physiological fall risk factors, particularly balance, increases the risk of falls in older cognitively impaired people.

Gait parameter risk factors for falls under simple and dual task conditions in cognitively impaired older people.

Taylor ME, Delbaere K, Mikolaizak AS, Lord SR, Close JC

Physical impairments in cognitively impaired older people: implications for risk of falls.

Taylor ME, Delbaere K, Lord SR, Mikolaizak AS, Close JC

Fall risk in the CIG was significantly increased due to multiple physical impairments. Physical profiles provide a means of quantifying the extent of impairment in older people with cognitive impairment and potential direction for targeting interventions for reducing fall risk.

Gait impairment and falls in cognitively impaired older adults: an explanatory model of sensorimotor and neuropsychological mediators.

Taylor ME, Ketels MM, Delbaere K, Lord SR, Mikolaizak AS, Close JC

to explore the associations between spatiotemporal gait parameters and falls in cognitively impaired older people and to investigate whether sensorimotor and neuropsychological factors mediate the association between gait performance and falls. the findings indicate that slow and variable gait patterns increase the risk of falls in cognitively impaired older adults. Further, the association between gait and falls seems to be mediated in large by reduced sensorimotor functioning. Further research is needed to investigate whether interventions aimed at improving gait and/or sensorimotor fall risk factors, such as strength and balance, can prevent falls in cognitively impaired older adults.

The Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). A comprehensive longitudinal validation study.

Delbaere K, Close JC, Mikolaizak AS, Sachdev PS, Brodaty H, Lord SR

this study aimed to perform a comprehensive validation of the 16-item and 7-item Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) by investigating the overall structure and measurement properties, convergent and predictive validity and responsiveness to change. the current study builds on the previously established psychometric properties of the FES-I. Both scales have acceptable structures, good validity and reliability and can be recommended for research and clinical purposes. Future studies should explore the FES-I's responsiveness to change during intervention studies and confirm suggested cut-points in other settings, larger samples and across different cultures.